Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Electrounrusting New question,old topic

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    1,215

    Default Electrounrusting New question,old topic

    I have several drums of rusted hardware. Nuts, bolts, washers, tools that I want to clean up and salvage what I can.
    I know, some one will say to buy new and sell this stuff for scrap. Scrap price is down and hardware prices are up.
    I will salvage what I can.
    I bought some Evaporust and it works well for small batches but pricey.
    I think my best bet is electrolysis.
    How do I get electric contact with every part when I put a basket full in the dip?
    The idea I have is to have two baskets and dump the goods from one to another, then put it back in the bath.
    Sure would like to single batch the stuff but I don't see how.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    457

    Default

    You could make a cylindrical basket and tumble them.

    Have you eliminated phosphoric acid from consideration?

    Ed
    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Big Prairie Mi.
    Posts
    2,167

    Default

    Just wondering, would a 'dump' of screws/bolts etc in the bottom of a bucket with a conductor buried in them work for electrolysis?

    phrased that way because it seams that if all the components in the pile are making good contact it seems to me like it would work,at least for the majority of them.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7,800

    Default

    For "several drums" It isn't going to work. and although "evaporust" works, it wouldn't be cost effective for the quantities you seem to have. Consider a tumbler barrel with sand. Not beach sand--the wave action has rounded of all of the cutting edges. Use sand from a pit, or better yet from a crusher.
    Brian Rupnow

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    1,724

    Default

    You could make quite a bit of progress just tumbling those parts against themselves. If you threw in a few handfuls of plastic vibratory tumbling media, some water and a sliver of soap it would work better yet.

    If I had your problem I'd find a metal mesh basket or make one. I'd suspend the basket from a wire or two in a bucket. Hang the wires onto a piece of wood across the top of the bucket. Put some metal down the sides of the bucket (actually I'd wrap sheet lead around the inside of the bucket). Add water and washing soda. Hook the basket wires to the negative terminal and the side metal to the positive terminal and apply power. Every so often turn the power off, take the basket out, and shake it to expose new rusty stuff. Generally the stuff on the surface will derust much faster than the stuff below.

    metalmagpie

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    If I had your problem I'd find a metal mesh basket or make one. I'd suspend the basket from a wire or two in a bucket. Hang the wires onto a piece of wood across the top of the bucket. Put some metal down the sides of the bucket (actually I'd wrap sheet lead around the inside of the bucket). Add water and washing soda. Hook the basket wires to the negative terminal and the side metal to the positive terminal and apply power. Every so often turn the power off, take the basket out, and shake it to expose new rusty stuff. Generally the stuff on the surface will derust much faster than the stuff below.

    metalmagpie[/QUOTE]

    That's the plan.
    I am going to split a plastic drum for the vessel. I think a shallow basket would be better than a deep one
    Last edited by 1-800miner; 11-13-2017 at 09:43 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    8,132

    Default

    I'd bead blast the lot!

    Or... Concrete mixer with wet coarse sand (yep.. it really does work).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    The problem with using electrolysis on the mystery metals you described is some of them will probably contain cadmium, chromium, nickel, and other metals. Those will end up in the solution, and I think they call that Hexavalent Chromium. That's very bad stuff, and it is verrry difficult to dispose of properly.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    NONE U BIDNESS
    Posts
    448

    Default

    A friend of mine had a fire and he used a small cement mixer with sand to clean all his tools.
    When he finished a batch they were good enough to use but all plating was gone.
    Over time a lot of them broke, due to the intense heat they were subjected to.

    THANX RICH
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    694

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Glug View Post
    The problem with using electrolysis on the mystery metals you described is some of them will probably contain cadmium, chromium, nickel, and other metals. Those will end up in the solution, and I think they call that Hexavalent Chromium. That's very bad stuff, and it is verrry difficult to dispose of properly.
    I recall that the problem occurs when you use stainless steel for the electrodes. Have not heard that is an issue when cleaning plated materials.
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 11-13-2017 at 11:00 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •