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Thread: Tip: Directional Terms For Polar/Cylindrical Coordinates

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    Useful writeup, Paul.

    Heh. I suspect you youngsters haven't seen carbon resistors with radial leads. I haven't either for 50 or 60 years...

    -js
    I'm guessing I'm youngster by this forum standards and I remember actually using those in less than 15 years ago.
    I'm fairly certain that if I dig enough deep to my junk boxes I can find hand full of those in 10K resistance.

    And just some time ago I ordered "radial" precision resistors from Digikey. This is actually most common style in high precision resistors even today:

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Oh come on Jim, it hasn't been that long ago that chip resistors came into use. Perhaps 25 or 35 years ago. And there are still a lot of resistors with leads around, even today.
    I was referring to carbon resistors with radial leads. Cylindrical, 1/8" to 3/8" in diameter, color coded with spots of paint instead of bands.

    My first communications receiver was full of them - a Radio Manufacturing Engineers RME-70, manufactured in 1936 or thereabouts and thoroughly obsolete by the time I bought it in the '50s. Full of vacuum tubes, many of them with grid caps.

    They don't make 'em like they used to. For that we can all be grateful.

    -js

  3. #13
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    Yes, that is exactly what I was thinking about when I said that a rectangular component can be described as radial. The wires exit from the rectangular package on a line (a radius) from a central axis of that brick shape. It is the POINT where they exit the package that makes them radial, not the direction of the wires themselves. Disc ceramic capacitors are also described as radial.

    Thanks for the photo.



    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    I'm guessing I'm youngster by this forum standards and I remember actually using those in less than 15 years ago.
    I'm fairly certain that if I dig enough deep to my junk boxes I can find hand full of those in 10K resistance.

    And just some time ago I ordered "radial" precision resistors from Digikey. This is actually most common style in high precision resistors even today:
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    But not so many with RADIAL leads, that look like an old "Globar" resistor.

    I happen to have a number of them that I just found when cleaning up. There were also some of the very similar tubular radial lead capacitors.
    I suspect we're talking about the same critter, Jerry. I've just been looking for a picture of these ancient artifacts and come up blank. Not that it matters in the slightest, of course.

    -js

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    I suspect we're talking about the same critter, Jerry. I've just been looking for a picture of these ancient artifacts and come up blank. Not that it matters in the slightest, of course.

    -js
    Easy...

    Res on the right, capacitors on the left.

    Did not include any precision spool-wound ones.

    Can we hijack this any more? Oooh look, a chicken.........

    Last edited by J Tiers; 12-07-2017 at 06:55 PM.
    1601

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    Hashim Khan

  6. #16
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    Most of those resistors on the right are wirewound and quite common. But the yellow one looks like it might be one of the old carbon resistors I was talking about.

    Squirrel!!!

    -js

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    Most of those resistors on the right are wirewound and quite common. But the yellow one looks like it might be one of the old carbon resistors I was talking about.

    Squirrel!!!

    -js
    Both the yellow and the green one are old, the 107K is also an older type. The large power resistor is a less common type. Even the power versions are less common, with so many of the square PW5 and PW10 around.

    The capacitors are ancient, but I left out the large bolt-down mica type.....
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  8. #18
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    Somewhere in a drawer I have a couple of large mica caps. About 3" diameter and 2.5" tall, with aluminum bolt-down flanges top and bottom. They were used in a 5KW AM (class C) transmitter. Plate modulated. This was in the olden days...

    Probably should quit hijacking...

    -js

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Stewart View Post
    I was referring to carbon resistors with radial leads. Cylindrical, 1/8" to 3/8" in diameter, color coded with spots of paint instead of bands.

    My first communications receiver was full of them - a Radio Manufacturing Engineers RME-70, manufactured in 1936 or thereabouts and thoroughly obsolete by the time I bought it in the '50s. Full of vacuum tubes, many of them with grid caps.

    They don't make 'em like they used to. For that we can all be grateful.

    -js
    Color coded " Body, End, Dot" :-) a lot of my first electronic work was done with those. 1940s area.
    ...lew...

  10. #20
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    To complicated for me. I'm going to go hide in the anti-spinward bushy end of my integral tree.

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