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Thread: My First 3D Print

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10,896

    Default My First 3D Print

    I finally broke down and ordered a 3D printer a couple of weeks ago. It took a bit over a week to arrive and I spent several hours one evening assembling it. The assembly was easy but I wanted to go slow and cautiously: counting parts and all that rot. I then spent another evening getting it set up and almost ready for a try. I wanted to have a trial with a known good model file. There are so many free models on the web that I had a bit of a time finding a sample 3D file to print but I finally found one for an accessory for the 3D printer itself. Anyway I started this first 3D print about 15 minutes ago and it is going along much faster than I thought. Here are some pictures as it was just starting:





    I am taking a video now and will post it as soon as I figure out how. The print is about 2.5" tall now so it is almost finished. This is really faster than I thought it was going to be: it only took about 35 or 40 minutes.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 12-07-2017 at 03:22 AM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Tarkio,Mo.
    Posts
    307

    Default

    So you get a Cetus. Me too. Love it . Now the fun begins, learning 3-d cad. Enjoy.
    Gary Davison

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,122

    Default

    I’ve been doing 3D modeling for about 25 years, but I am looking forward to Christmas this year. I got my 13 year old grandson a 3D printer! He’s in a STEM program, has AutoCAD and Robotics classes this semester and SolidWorks next semester.

    It has been tough for me to come up with a need for a 3D printer as I built the CNC mill/lathe and can do an awful lot with that.

  4. #4

    Default

    Congratulations, just a thought, the best improvement I did to my 3d printer was to install octoprint on a beaglebone black sbc and have it permanently as a 3d printer print server accessible from my house lan.
    I can upload stl files and slice them right on the server, and when I power up the printer the stl & gcode files are all there on the sd card with all the sucessful parameters for repeat prints unless I purposefully delete them.
    If I powered it up now, I could be printing one of the things I've already made within the time it takes to heat the bed and hot end up. And I don't have to worry about leaving a pc on, if the pc cpu gets overloaded suddenly and cant deliver, how fragile that little micro usb connector hooking it the pc is and if Im working from the pc or a tablet sat in the lounge etc.
    A lot of people run raspberry Pi's but I have had some bad experiences with their reliability even following all the recomendations around shutdown, psu and sd card selection, but the Beaglebone's have always been rock solid for me, so much so that I dont shut it down properly just hit a switch that throws power to everything to cut it all off in one go.
    The other thing most people make should be a spool holder on bearings somehow, so it feeds without fuss.

    My kid's school got a 3d printer, and they had to do solidworks and stuff, and my boy was like meh, we've been doing that at home for years and showed the teacher how to do some extra bits n bobs and brought some of his work home to print as we had different filaments and a larger built capability

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    10,896

    Default

    I meant to get back to this thread sooner. I did finish that first 3D print and made another of an item that I designed.

    The part from the web:



    It printed perfectly on the first try. This was my first 3D print and I accepted all the default values, including printing what they call a "raft" and a "support" under the part. I guess these are designed to provide a better base to help hold the part down or to help pry it off after printing is finished. These seem to be hard to remove form the part after it is removed from the print platform so I checked the boxes to omit both of them on my second printed part.

    And I had designed this with Fusion 360 while waiting for the printer to arrive.



    It is a stand for a TV remote. I designed it because the lid on the battery compartment was broken and would not stay closed. It also allows me to stand the remote up on the desk or table with much less chance of it falling over.

    Here is the finished part. I only had to do a bit of filing and sanding on the bottom because there were some protruding spots where the screws that hold the print platform down were.



    Luck was with me and it fit perfectly on the TV remote the first time. And it holds the broken battery lid in place.



    I love 3D printing.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 12-13-2017 at 01:54 AM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    944

    Default

    Paul, what I have found a lot of the STL files on Thingverse are just that. They have never been prepared for 3D printing, and some may never print. I like to see in the documentation photos of an actual 3D print before I even download it!
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - MakerGear M2 3D printer- 20 Watt Ray Fine Galvo fiber laser, LightObject 40 watt co2 Laser Engraver

  7. #7

    Default

    Not all shapes and styles of raft/support are equal when it comes to ease of removal also. I really like the straight lines type with low fill percentages in the infil (15%) because this makes them delicate and fragile and easy to tear off with just your fingers or some pliers. They've only got to survive well enough to support the overhung layer, or make the part adhere to the bed properly evenly.
    From what I have seen these numbers differ from printer to printer and user to user, but this is part of the getting to know/experiment bit of using one.
    I printed off a L00 spindle nose protector yesterday, think it took about 4 hrs, the stl is out on the net somewhere if people want to google for it as it was published in MEW so not linking directly but wow, although I did have to scale it by 25.4, so I think there was a imperial metric thing going on at some stage... And if I have a crash and wreck it, it costs me 50c of plastic to run another one off.
    Another string to your bow as they say. Enjoy experimenting, and try all the different filament types too. Ninjaflex (flexible filament) is still the hardest to print reliably for me, but I've sucessfully printed elastics and guides in "rubber" using it that I had no other way of making...

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