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Thread: O.T. Chili (cold weather comfort food)

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by HWooldridge View Post
    I'm 5th gen Texan and don't object to beans in the chili or on the side - it's all good.
    agreed. Call me anything, but don't call me late for dinner. For those who don't think the four meat chili is chili, I won't argue, but let me then introduce you to something so much better than chili

    Big problem in making a batch is i've now got two vegetarian daughters and the boys, well one son is in Glasgow and one in Calgary....so the carnivorous are getting spread a little thin at my place
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-12-2018 at 02:10 PM.
    .

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euph0ny View Post
    Not chili, but certainly cold-weather comfort food. Here's a civet de marcassin (wild boar stew) that I happen to have on the go right now:



    In a hot pan with some oil, brown cubes of boar meat, toss in minced garlic and ginger, diced onion, carrot, potato and celeriac. Fry for a few minutes, add a squirt of tomato purée and allow a few bits to stick to the pan and get caramelised. Add a stock cube if you have one, salt, and pepper, then a bottle of beer (Hachenburger black if possible: http://hachenburger.de/hachenburger-...k-beer?lang=en ) and bring to a roiling boil. Transfer to a slow cooker, scraping out the caramelised bits! Add a couple of laurel leaves, thyme and rosemary, and let cook on "low" for four or five hours. Allow to cool overnight, remove the wilted herbs, reheat, adjust seasoning (maybe with a splash of Worcester sauce or green tabasco) and serve.
    I gotta say that looks absolutely fabulous. We have a lot of feral hogs roaming around here so I may pop one with the Marlin and have a go at your recipe...yum.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I do have a new goal and that is to learn how to make good green Chili - if you have chili and a piece of bread *(and some wine) you got a meal...

    iv recently had some very good green chili and am going to get the recipe - i want to make about 3 gallons of it and freeze some...
    There are somewhere between 400,000 and 3 million different ways to make green chile... And I don't think a single one of them is bad...

    My versions always have MEAT... Pork butt or chicken thighs.

    Creamy style....

    Quick and dirty and cheap: Cream of mushroom soup with green chiles.. Makes a good quick enchilada, obviously add cheese.. Its really not bad.

    High scale quick and dirty: Jar of alfredo sauce with green chiles... The Santa Fe grill out here does this, they call it "Milenese sauce".. It is good in a
    burrito and also makes decent enchiladas..

    Straight creamy style. White sauce with chiles... Onions, garlic, usually chicken base, a bit of herbage, and meat... Works great with garlic bread as a stew, and
    makes great enchiladas..

    cheesy creamy style... Straight creamy style, with a butt load of cheese.. Like meaty mac and cheese sauce with chile and meat.. I really like chicken thighs for
    this.. boneless and skinless. Sautee them up first and use the drippings to make your sauce. My favorite eaten as a stew with garlic bread...

    Then you have the veggie style..

    Basically tomato sauce, minus the italian herbage, plus chiles and meat.. The stuff in the can is made with green tomatoes so it still looks green, but a very
    tasty GREEN chile sauce can actually be red because of the tomatoes.. Not as great when eaten as a stew, but its still pretty good, I prefer a roasted pork
    butt chopped into cubes in this style of chile.

    ALWAYS buy mild chile, weather frozen, fresh or in cans.. You can always add heat, but you CAN NOT take it away.. I suggest Chile Arbol for adding the heat..
    It doesn't adversely effect the flavor... Cayenne just makes things bitter and nasty.. Hot sauces usually have vinegar which messes everything up..

    Just because its Chile, it doesn't have to be hot.. Its just got to taste good.

    And just to rub it in... Roasted, chopped, and frozen green chiles down at the restaurant supply store are between $4.50 and $6.00 for a 5lb bag.


    My biggest tip for making good ChilE... Keep it simple.. Keep the herbage down.. A tiny bit of oregano or mexican oregano if you can get it. Salt pepper
    garlic. I have no problem substituting beer for water, and an occasional splash of wine.. Veggies are tomatoes, chiles and onions.. Simple corn
    starch to thicken.. A roux really doesn't bring much to the party..

    Meat wise... It doesn't always have to be browned.. I prefer my red chile with boiled pork steaks (chopped into cubes). Boiled chicken thighs really
    bring the flavor in the broth and give the chile a lighter texture. Roasted pork butt makes the best meat for an enchilada, or at least I think so...

    Hopefully that gives you enough to make some chile.. If you can make home made mac and cheese, or a creamed soup or spaghetti sauce, you can make chile.

    And even if you totally mess it up, its still going to be good.

  4. #74
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    Better flavor is available with tomatillos added, and also with some epazote. otherwise you get a tasteless gringo version.

    Those are not compatible with certain alternate flavorings, though.
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  5. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobw53 View Post
    My biggest tip for making good ChilE... Keep it simple.. Keep the herbage down.. A tiny bit of oregano or mexican oregano if you can get it. Salt pepper
    garlic. I have no problem substituting beer for water, and an occasional splash of wine.. Veggies are tomatoes, chiles and onions.. Simple corn
    starch to thicken.. A roux really doesn't bring much to the party..
    Simple is good but I have to respectfully disagree on the roux. I generally make a very light brown roux and add to that (and I often use chicken stock for the base liquid). I cook a lot of Cajun dishes so cooking a roux is second nature.

    If you haven't done so, try a mix of dried arbol, guajillo and chile ancho (or pasilla) - I grind dry in the spice blender then put that powder into the sauce with the other ingredients. Great flavor...

    And maybe I missed it above but venison works quite well as a basic meat.

    FWIW, here is my basic chili recipe:

    For 3lb of meat

    Dry Red Chile Powder (Hatch Big Jim or equiv.) 5 TBL
    Flour 5 TBL
    Cumin (comino) 1 TBL
    Salt 2 TBL
    Black Pepper 2 TBL
    Dried Onion Flakes 2 TBL
    Dried Minced Garlic 2 TBL
    Diced Rotel Tomatoes 3 - 10 oz can
    Chipotle Jalapenos in Adobo Sauce (San Marcos or Herdez) 7 oz can *
    Worcestershire 3 TSP
    Water ** 3 - 10 oz can
    Ranch Style Beans *** 1 - 26 oz can

    Notes: * Chipotle Jalapenos are the primary heat source in this mix but the batch of chili powder makes a difference. I usually put one or two chipotles in the blender and puree them for one pound of meat. However, if the powder is already hot, this may be too spicy so try a milder chili powder then add heat to taste. Most any red chile powder from New Mexico is very good. Cayenne powder may also be added for more kick.

    Some measures are not linear and large quantities must be checked for taste. It’s easy to put in too much salt, black pepper, onion and garlic. The 3 lb recipe tastes fine using 4 or 5 lbs of meat – especially with beans. The flour in this recipe will burn easily if simmered too high or stirred too infrequently so scrape the pot bottom often; add water if necessary. Chili will taste better if cooked then allowed to set up overnight in the refrigerator and eaten later.

    ** Fill and reuse tomato cans for water.

    *** Beans are optional. The Ranch Style with sweet onion is good but cut back on the dried onion flakes. Beans and/or rice can also be served as a side dish.

    ~ May use ground beef, venison or venison/pork mix. All give a slightly different flavor. Plain venison may have a little bacon fat or cooking oil added. I prefer fine ground meat but my son uses coarse ground or cubed meat. Either is good, just different texture.
    Last edited by HWooldridge; 01-12-2018 at 07:27 PM.

  6. #76
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    With all this cooking going on, you guys must have unheated shops and waiting for the temperature to go back up.

  7. #77
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    They are trying to heat their shops using an "alternative" method. It also keeps other people out of the shop.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by HWooldridge View Post
    I gotta say that looks absolutely fabulous. We have a lot of feral hogs roaming around here so I may pop one with the Marlin and have a go at your recipe...yum.
    Happy hunting! I shot that boar myself too.

    I did break down and taste a spoonful of the stew last night before bed. It was very good indeed, but will taste even better today. Stew always seems to taste best a day or two after it is made. I've just reconstituted a big handful of dried porcini mushrooms in boiling water. When I warm up the stew for dinner, I'll add the porcini and their soaking water to the pot.

    Now I'm wondering whether to serve it with crusty baguette, pilaf rice, potatoes, or to make some späzle...

  9. #79
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    Part of me wishes we had more feral hogs around here for the extra freezer filling hunting opportunity, but the other 90% is glad we dont because they are so damaging. I have seen one here about 7 years ago. Running down the shoulder of the road of all places. The MNR will deny they are here (same as cougers), but I know some people who work for the local conservation authority who see both quite regularly, as well as some neighbors and farmers.

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Euph0ny View Post
    mushrooms in boiling water.
    I never understood why people like to eat fungus... Blleeaahhhh...
    Work hard play hard

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