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Thread: Chuck size for a 9' benchtop lathe

  1. #21
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    Unless you have no plans at all to do work on "full size" or "normal size" machinery and only work on models or other such small stuff I would, within reason, get a large chuck. As for the tapered roller bearings, they are probably rated for quite a load. If you look up the capacity for them, one of the size for a 9" lathe spindle is probably rated for a thousand lbs. or more, just a guess but I know tapered roller bearings have a high load rating.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wdtom44 View Post
    Unless you have no plans at all to do work on "full size" or "normal size" machinery and only work on models or other such small stuff I would, within reason, get a large chuck. As for the tapered roller bearings, they are probably rated for quite a load. If you look up the capacity for them, one of the size for a 9" lathe spindle is probably rated for a thousand lbs. or more, just a guess but I know tapered roller bearings have a high load rating.
    Doesn’t matter what size the lathe is, your going to hit the limits. The locomotive I decided to build has 10” wheels, which puts my new lathe to its limits. Finished locomotive will weigh over 750 lbs. Not bad for a model. Looking at my new lathe, part of me is thinking, “Hmm, next one will be 16”


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  3. #23
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    Measure the clearance between your 100mm chuck and the top of the saddle, a 160 mm will be 30mm less and could be a problem. The bigger the chuck, the more it projects from the head stock, which may reduce the affective length.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by wdtom44 View Post
    Unless you have no plans at all to do work on "full size" or "normal size" machinery and only work on models or other such small stuff I would, within reason, get a large chuck. As for the tapered roller bearings, they are probably rated for quite a load. If you look up the capacity for them, one of the size for a 9" lathe spindle is probably rated for a thousand lbs. or more, just a guess but I know tapered roller bearings have a high load rating.
    The dual row ball nose bearing on my 10" Logan (1 1/2-8 spindle) has a rating around 8000 lb. Discount that a lot for long life, and you still have a very significant load rating. Almost any roller bearing will greatly exceed a ball bearing as to ratings, so clearly that 1000 lb estimate is very much an understatement. The chuck weight will not be an issue with any credible roller bearing.
    1601

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    Hashim Khan

  5. #25
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    I hadn't noticed that this is a round bar bed style lathe. Given that I'd say that if you're more comfy working with wood that a good sturdy wood bench would be fine. And more portable as well. And better able to store lots of heavy accessories you can use.

    Sadly the round bars for the bed is going to greatly reduce the rigidity of this lathe. It'll still be good for a lot of smaller model making jobs but just not as solid as the size of the machine would suggest.

    For MOST things it'll be just fine as is. But those times with larger or more chatter prone cuts you might look at a "bed brace" setup that wedges in just behind the carriage and locks down to the lower box section to help out. You would need to place it for the one cut then remove it when you need to run the carriage towards the tail or the tail stock up for some drilling. But if it's easy to put in place and remove that won't be a big deal.

    I like this idea better than the "rail" suggested earlier because that rail would need to run very, very parallel to the bars. With a brace which you lock in and adjust to seat and support in a few well selected positions you won't distort the bars as much and won't affect the travel of the carriage.

    And with a bit of thought I think it could be all made with some simple cuts and the saddles for the round bar bored using the lathe itself.... although it would certainly be easier if you had a mill as well.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Sadly the round bars for the bed is going to greatly reduce the rigidity of this lathe. It'll still be good for a lot of smaller model making jobs but just not as solid as the size of the machine would suggest.
    I've never actually seen this lathe. I suspect almost none of us have. While the above statement may hold true, a few things make a difference. First, are the 2 steel bars simply supported at both ends? Or are they under tension? Are they solid or are they hollow?

    Gotta look at the whole design, not just one aspect of one feature.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  7. #27
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    Take a close look at the pic in the original post. Should answer most questions.

    You can see one set of supports, and judge for yourself if tension is even possible in a reasonable way, and one can clearly see that the support is more complex than a "simple support".
    Last edited by J Tiers; 02-13-2018 at 10:44 PM.
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Take a close look at the pic in the original post. Should answer most questions.
    Nice reply, but totally wrong. Are they hollow? Are they under tension? Is the lower box solid, hollow or braced internally?

    Only a fool will look at a low res picture and imagine that they can divine more than the most superficial design aspects.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    Nice reply, but totally wrong. Are they hollow? Are they under tension? Is the lower box solid, hollow or braced internally?

    Only a fool will look at a low res picture and imagine that they can divine more than the most superficial design aspects.


    It's a glorified wood turning lathe.
    I would not bother with big chuck, heavy stand or fancy toolholders.
    The limiting factor is unfortunately the round bar bed design.

  10. #30
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    I think a good general rule is looking at weight of the lathe. Compare the weight to known high quality lathes. Not much in the 9” sector, but my 8” weighs at least 250 lbs. There’s no substitute for mass.

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