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Thread: Mini pallet faux pas

  1. #11
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    Put in the pins first. Clamped well, of course. Just drilling and reaming won't tend to move much.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmarkwolf View Post
    ... Knocking off the bottom corner of the plate might improve it further. ...
    If you want a tight fit, you should either bevel the corner of the plate, or undercut the inside corner on the cylinder.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    If you want a tight fit, you should either bevel the corner of the plate, or undercut the inside corner on the cylinder.
    A true 90 degree "mating" between the plate and the round stock is my goal. I was thinking that the plate might have a sharp corner, whereas there might be a small radius in the inside corner of the round stock, holding the plate off a little bit.

    Still wondering how best to clamp the two pieces so I don't get any relative movement between the two while drilling and reaming.

  4. #14
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    I don't understand why the 90* mating is important. I would think the important part would be that the plate is parallel (or perpendicular) to the table. Square stock would have worked better. The round stock will clamp where ever it is if the plate is resting on the vise. Your set up isn't particularly stable to begin with. Pallets are typically held between the stationary jaw and a movable jaw at the rear of the vise. This makes the entire top surface of the vise a solid base for the pallet. That "round thing" is unnecessary.

    ADDED:
    Ops! Missed the part about the sine plate. Forget the "square stock" and rear jaw suggestion. Your sine plate won't be stable unless you can affix both ends of the angle. That flag portion will be bobbing up and down like a Whack-A-Mole.
    Last edited by CCWKen; 03-13-2018 at 10:09 AM. Reason: Addition

  5. #15
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    There is another way to do this. You won't like it though because it means turfing the flat plate you have already.

    The new method would be to run an angled corner relief slot in the round stock. Then drill and counterbore for cap screws up through the round at a 45 from below so the screws enter into the new plate at a 45 through the inside edge of the corner. That way when tightened the screws pull the corner of the plate securely into the corner. No pins needed and a sure fire way to ensure that the plate is dead nutz tight into the corner in both directions.

    If you look at some of the commercial sine plates I think you'll find that this screws on a 45 to pull the round bar into the plate or the plate onto the round bar is a pretty common arrangement. it automatically ensures a tight joint in both directions as long as corner rebates or slots on the plate are machined true in all respects. Have a look at the stuff that shows up when you google for images of "sine plate" and you'll see what I mean.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post

    ADDED:
    Your sine plate won't be stable unless you can affix both ends of the angle. That flag portion will be bobbing up and down like a Whack-A-Mole.
    Hi Ken - the "far end" of the plate will be supported by machinist jacks.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    There is another way to do this. You won't like it though because it means turfing the flat plate you have already.

    The new method would be to run an angled corner relief slot in the round stock. Then drill and counterbore for cap screws up through the round at a 45 from below so the screws enter into the new plate at a 45 through the inside edge of the corner. That way when tightened the screws pull the corner of the plate securely into the corner. No pins needed and a sure fire way to ensure that the plate is dead nutz tight into the corner in both directions.

    If you look at some of the commercial sine plates I think you'll find that this screws on a 45 to pull the round bar into the plate or the plate onto the round bar is a pretty common arrangement. it automatically ensures a tight joint in both directions as long as corner rebates or slots on the plate are machined true in all respects. Have a look at the stuff that shows up when you google for images of "sine plate" and you'll see what I mean.
    I like that idea. Wish it had occurred to me. I could just flip the plate end for end and start over with your idea. Or maybe just "turf" the plate as you say. It was a drop and I think I only paid $8.
    Last edited by jmarkwolf; 03-13-2018 at 05:30 PM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    There is another way to do this. You won't like it though because it means turfing the flat plate you have already.

    The new method would be to run an angled corner relief slot in the round stock. Then drill and counterbore for cap screws up through the round at a 45 from below so the screws enter into the new plate at a 45 through the inside edge of the corner. That way when tightened the screws pull the corner of the plate securely into the corner. No pins needed and a sure fire way to ensure that the plate is dead nutz tight into the corner in both directions.
    I've been giving some thought as to how to approach this method. I've included an AutoCad scale DWG below.

    The bottom image is what I think BCRider is describing. The middle one is how I imagine the setup for drilling the clearance hole for the SHCS, and the top image is how I imagine the setup for counter boring for the head of the SHCS

    Do I have this basically correct? Would four 3/8-16 SHCS's be adequate?

    What would the setup be for drilling into the corner of the plate? Getting a good clamp on the round stock is problematic.

    Forgive the questions, I'm a newbie.


    Last edited by jmarkwolf; 03-15-2018 at 02:33 PM.

  9. #19
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    Your drawing is exactly what I was thinking.

    I originally suggested cutting a slight corner relief slot in the round piece. But let's alter that idea to kill two birds with one stone. Set up the plate on the 45* angle and mill off a bit of a chamfer. That would give you the required corner clearance and also give you a flat area to use for starting the hole. Although if you did this in the mill another option would be to start with a 3/8" full size flat from a center cutting end mill just where the screws go and just deep enough to show a full circle. Or maybe not quite a full circle. That way you won't have any encouragement for the drill and tap to wander.

    If it were me doing this I'd go for an 1/8" chamfer for the initial corner then cut the 3/8 recesses into position then drill and tap. In my case I don't have a DRO so just to avoid a lot of "by the numbers" stuff I'd do the flat seat, drilling and tapping all in one go for each hole. But if you have a DRO then by all means do all the same operations at the same time using the DRO to set each position.

    Howzatt?

  10. #20
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    Apr 2003
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    New Hampshire
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    could you weld it and then skim cut the plate?

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