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Thread: Brass is expensive. Anybody make their own?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickeyf View Post
    No gloves while skimming, but at least they put them on for pouring. No eye or face protection either. Presumably lead? I wonder if these guys end up as mad as the Hatters did back in the day? (But that was mercury, not lead, if I recall...)
    Your recollection is incorrect. See the book "Frozen in Time" the search for the Franklin expedition, documents the cause of insanity of the commanding officers as due to the "new" technology of soldering tin cans, used for food storage for the officers.
    Last edited by bob_s; 05-15-2018 at 03:53 PM. Reason: Last line

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpt View Post
    If you pour it over the driveway wouldn't it lay flat and be a "sheet"?

    YEA...That's the ticket....LOL

    FWIW...Most lead and other heavy metal poisoning is from breathing of the fumes. In the grand scheme of things, working with metals via hand contact isn't that dangerous. On another note... The western world's use of leaded gasoline most probably was one of the most harmful things to civilization. HUNDREDS of Tons of lead were burned in gasoline every year. A total of 7 million tons were airborne through the usage of leaded gasoline.
    https://www.thenation.com/article/secret-history-lead/

    ".... so much lead had been deposited into soils, streets, building surfaces, that an estimated 68 million children would register toxic levels of lead absorption and some 5,000 American adults would die annually of lead-induced heart disease. As lead affects cognitive function, some neuroscientists also suggested that chronic lead exposure resulted in a measurable drop in IQ scores during the leaded gas era. And more recently, of course, researchers had suggested that TEL exposure and resulting nervous system damage may have contributed to violent crime rates in the 20th century."
    Last edited by Tim9lives; 05-15-2018 at 04:42 PM.

  3. #33
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    Years ago when a student metalsmith, we cast various non ferrous alloys and then rolled them into sheets. Metals were melted in a ceramic crucible and then poured into a heated cast iron ingot mold. Pickled in sulphuric acid and then rolled a bit. The partially rolled plate would be annealed and pickled again and scrubbed with pumice powder to homogenize the surface. Roll, anneal and repeat until the desired thickness. Jewelers size rolling mills are available but get expensive if you get above a 3" wide roll.
    I still have a few rolling mill and from time to time will roll a piece of non ferrous sheet for a project. One of the rolling mills is missing two gears and I'd like to find some for it. They are sort of special though and have rather tall teeth to accommodate the range of thickness adjustment.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    Only if you like to see exploding concrete with molten metal flying all over.

    Brian
    Ok, ok, might have to lay down a steel sheet on the driveway first.
    Andy

  5. #35
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    Yea, but if you are going to collect scrap, just how will you know what percentages of what is in them?



    Quote Originally Posted by michigan doug View Post
    I will try some experiments this summer and report back.

    360 is 61% copper, 36% zinc and 3% lead. Not so bad, but you have to put in a little extra zinc and hold your mouth right, because you will boil some zinc off even if you throw it in right at the end.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Yea, but if you are going to collect scrap, just how will you know what percentages of what is in them?
    Acquire or build a DIY XRF gun!

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Yea, but if you are going to collect scrap, just how will you know what percentages of what is in them?
    +1 to the above.
    Buying turning from a shop would be a big mistake as well, no doubt it wouldn't even be pure brass. ...and again what alloys?

  8. #38
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    ...and new potable plumbing brass typically has close to zero lead.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob_s View Post
    Your recollection is incorrect. See the book "Frozen in Time" the search for the Franklin expedition, documents the cause of insanity of the commanding officers as due to the "new" technology of soldering tin cans, used for food storage for the officers.
    You are both correct: soldered food tins poisoned members of the Franklin expedition; nitrate of mercury (used to cure felt) poisoned hatters.

  10. #40
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    Even if I never do it, this has been an illuminating thread.

    Copper wire is almost universally pure copper, so that's easy.

    Also, the zinc in pennies is very pure, not counting the copper plating. And cheap, and available.

    For the tiny amounts of pure lead, you could buy that. Cheap and available.

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