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Thread: clock winding ratchet

  1. #1
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    Default clock winding ratchet

    how do I build one, the one i need has 14 div. with id of 1.000. i know this is not like a gear like this https://www.ebay.com/itm/11mm-REPLAC...-/400676485932

    So how is it done and what cutter I have never made one of these

  2. #2
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    How bout this and a dividing head? You can get them in various angles. Could even use an inexpensive router bit. JR

    dovetail cutter
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  3. #3
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    get just got that now how do i get 14 in to 360 = 25.7142857 for the div. I never have on this or a gear

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Hurt View Post
    get just got that now how do i get 14 in to 360 = 25.7142857 for the div. I never have on this or a gear
    Can you plot that out on paper via the computer and use that as a guide with the dividing head? JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRouche View Post
    Can you plot that out on paper via the computer and use that as a guide with the dividing head? JR

    Last edited by JRouche; 05-16-2018 at 08:26 PM.
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  6. #6
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    Default

    Do you even have a dividing head? If not, what?

    14 divisions.

    A spin index, which has 360 divisions will not come out even (360/14 = 25.71...). But a winding ratchet does not have to be very precise so you could round to the nearest degree and it would work. In fact you would be hard pressed to notice the differences. Here is a table you could follow. The worst error is 0.43 degree.

    0
    26
    51
    77
    103
    129
    154
    180
    206
    231
    257
    283
    309
    334
    360

    If you have an indexing head or rotary table that has any gear ratio that is even (1:40 or 1:90 are common ones), then you can use any hole circle that has any multiple of 7 holes: 7, 14, 21, 28, etc. If you can provide the details, I/we can advise on turns and holes per division.

    If you have neither of the above, you can use a paper scale as suggested above. Any CAD program can compose and print a suitable scale. Again, for a winding ratchet, a lot of precision is not really needed.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  7. #7
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    We are over - thinking this ! It's a simple ratchet not a cog wheel and in brass at that. How about a pair of dividers and a file.

    Joe B

  8. #8
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    Yep, in fact that is how some of the old clock/watch makers would have done it. Scratch a circle. Set the dividers with a good (or bad) guess. Step around that circle and observe the error. Make a correction and try again. Repeat until you can not see any further error.

    Not super precise, but it will work.

    Stop worrying about it and just do it.



    Quote Originally Posted by JoeCB View Post
    We are over - thinking this ! It's a simple ratchet not a cog wheel and in brass at that. How about a pair of dividers and a file.

    Joe B
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Yep, in fact that is how some of the old clock/watch makers would have done it. Scratch a circle. Set the dividers with a good (or bad) guess. Step around that circle and observe the error. Make a correction and try again. Repeat until you can not see any further error.

    Not super precise, but it will work.

    Stop worrying about it and just do it.
    That is actually a pretty precise way to map out a bolt circle.

    I was gonna suggest that but it seemed like Brett wanted to use another method. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  10. #10
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-we6ORrJgUI

    Most spring winding ratchets don't have to be terribly precise. I've made one of these and used it to make plastic gears for my mini mill and mini lathe. It should be pretty easy to adapt it to a ratchet wheel using just a straight milling cutter set to mid point on the blank. Make shallow cut, turn blank, make next cut.

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