Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 81

Thread: Bench grinder tool rests, tilt or not?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    91

    Default Bench grinder tool rests, tilt or not?

    I recently bought an old but working bench grinder





    However the tool rests are not very well designed, they sit below the center line of the wheel and do not have any support on the sides for the tool. I primarily intend to use this to grind HSS tool bits for the lathe and perhaps sharpening my TIG electrodes. I use a belt grinder for most of my needs.

    My question is, is it worth the extra effort to add a tilting function to the new tool rests? I know I want bigger tool rests that give support on both sides of the wheels for tool bit grinding. But I don't know if I need a tilting function, the shape of the wheel creates the neccessary clearance angle on it's own. And for TIG sharpening I just chuck it in the drill and sharpen against the wheel freehand.

    So I am leaning towards I don't need it, but I want some input from others, maybe it's worth doing after all.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    994

    Default

    When did you have a machine that had too many adjustments ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    739

    Default

    Absolutely do you need the tilt function. I don't even know why bench grinders are sold without it.

    Here's the style I have (the exact same rest is sold under different names and prices. Search for "grinder rest".)
    https://smile.amazon.com/Grinder-Rep...dp/B01A16NSKQ/

    Some of the rests have issues with actually holding your settings. Putting paper between the moving parts solved that problem very nicely.

    I only wish that track on the bottom was available separately. I'd love to use the rests for other tools like my belt sander.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,809

    Default

    if grinding lathe tools on a bench grinder, my preference is no rest. You end up holding them by hand anyway and the rest just gets in the way. I made a complicated grinder rest thing decades ago because the factory ones seemed so inadequate, basically it has proven to largely have been a waste of time....although for more rough and ready work, or dressing the wheel, the rest is handy.
    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    UK, near London
    Posts
    991

    Default

    Re the one in the link. If you clamp the tool in the fixture and set all the angles sure you can move it sideways but how do you advance it towards the wheel except because the stupid thing flexes? A triumph of CAD over actually testing the end result.
    People put too much stock in fancy rests and end up with a million knobs and a wibbly wobbly contraption that takes all day to set.
    Just remove the rests, fix grinder to stout flat bit of wood, make a solid block of wood that takes tool up above centreline so that the natural curve of the wheel creates the desired angle. Top the block with 1/8 flat steel so that the tool slides easily. Remind yourself not to faff around with gimmicks and just get on with it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    91

    Default

    My plan for a non tilting table setup is to make it all of metal and re-use as many existing parts as possible. Now if I am foregoing the need to tilt the table and using scrap parts I got laying about... I can simply TIG weld a spacer onto the current tool rests and then to that attach a 3/8" steel plate as a the new tool rest. Then I retain the existing function for moving the table in and out as the wheel diameter changes.

    It's a matter of effort vs. usefulness. I have a tilting table on my belt grinder and I use it often, but I knew I would need it from the start.

    I don't care for the style in the link, doesn't look solid enough.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chester, NH
    Posts
    5,341

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 754 View Post
    When did you have a machine that had too many adjustments ?
    When I bought a Bridgeport, aka the "wet noodle"...

    I thought I was going to be the voice of dissent but Mcgyver beat me to it. For grinding lathe tools, I agree that a rest is not necessary at all. I had planned on making a fancy rest to help me get the exact, prescribed angles on my cutting tools and grind "perfect" 60* threading tools. I never got around to it because I was always busy with something else and - out of necessity - I got pretty good at free handing. I still keep a flat rest on mine because I find it convenient for roughing in larger bits for the first time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Brampton, Ontario
    Posts
    460

    Default

    I made this one here out of scrap angle and some 1/4" plate:

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/thr...ools?p=1139415

    Two adjustments, plus a mitre gauge, not too noodly. Lets me set angle and distance without any trouble, and can get lots of height for shallow angles on chisels and such. I use toothed lockwashers in between the joints to improve the rigidity, I haven't had any issues and its very handy.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    28,029

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    if grinding lathe tools on a bench grinder, my preference is no rest. You end up holding them by hand anyway and the rest just gets in the way. I made a complicated grinder rest thing decades ago because the factory ones seemed so inadequate, basically it has proven to largely have been a waste of time....although for more rough and ready work, or dressing the wheel, the rest is handy.
    Sounds like the "I don't need no stinking mic, if you can't eyeball the size within a thou, you should take up knitting instead".

    Yes you CAN get reasonable results by eye when grinding totally freehand, but a rest is really useful, even if you just use it for a reference, and do not fussily re-adjust for every angle. It is hard to avoid inadvertent movement when you have absolutely no reference or support. So you are likely to round a few edges, etc.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    5,402

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    And for TIG sharpening I just chuck it in the drill and sharpen against the wheel freehand.
    Never grind perpendicular to the tungsten. You always want to grind parallel to the tungsten.

    Work hard play hard

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •