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Thread: Bench grinder tool rests, tilt or not?

  1. #51
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    For truing I believe you have to work off a rest or guard. Just moving a diamond back and forth, won't get it dead true.
    True running wheel flat across the front is a treat to use..
    Plus it's very cool to watch the diamond turn orange while truing. Make sure you have some kind off fine infeed.

  2. #52
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    Dennis, I like your option of a good belt grinder for mild steel and other uses over a grinder with regular wheels. If I had half a brain I'd copy your plan. Making up a nice shop built 2x72 belt grinder is on the list... but it's a LONG list.

    The roller type back in the days before cheap diamond tooling was used for both. But it needed a rest spaced away from the wheel far enough to get the hooks hung over the front edge. Then a firm hand and lots of will power and control to kiss the wheel to remove high spots and achieve trueness. Just jamming it onto the face is fine for dressing the surface but it won't true diddly without the reference off the rest from the hooks and a firm supportive hold on the tool.

  3. #53
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    As for rests, There is nothing wrong with a rest that is always horizontal as long as it has a good range of vertical and in and out capability. All tilt really does is keep the contact spot in a location easy to observe.

    As for wheels, I've developed strong preferences for coarse wheels for sharpening HSS or wood working tools. The wheel is used to produce geometry and "get real close" to the final edge. A coarse wheel does the heavy lifting so much more quickly and with so little heat compared to a fine grit wheel.

    The final edge can be "dusted off" on a fine wheel, but it won't be sharp. Every edge needs a few licks with a hand stone to refine the edge. With carbide, that can mean putting on a small chamfer. Yup! dull that edge for some situations.

    I like using an adjustable rest for lathe tools as I appreciate "single facet" geometries. Off hand just never seems as neat and clean.
    Then for tools like a parting blade. I can set the grind rest and know I can return and restore a burned or rubbed edge in just one or two passes.

    There are lots of ways to do shop tasks. The variety is delightful.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Or something like this, which is probably the same thing.
    yes for T&CG use. The guys who've been here awhile may remember seeing this before, I made it probably a decade ago and use it all the time....most recently a few weeks ago to grind a tool for an internal buttress thread. Its got a drill attachment and thing for holding tool bits. The drill attachment design I'm very pleased with, but have been thinking of making another univise. With a bit more experience and time in with it, I'd like it more compact and use split cotters to clamp, that would make it much easier to use. The other thing I don't like is how hard it is to read the degrees, I'm thinking little printed plastic gears, an encoder and digital read outs





    .

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Dennis, I like your option of a good belt grinder for mild steel and other uses over a grinder with regular wheels. If I had half a brain I'd copy your plan. Making up a nice shop built 2x72 belt grinder is on the list... but it's a LONG list.
    I have designed in fusion 360 a metric version of the same grinder that Jeremy Schmidt has built on youtube. This is what I plan on building, I have a few suitable motors at hand, a 1400rpm 2.2kw 3phase one might do it, I have a 3kw one but it's so physically large and ungainly. I also have a 4kw 2800rpm model (2-pole @ 50hz) that is heavy as hell but more compact.



    As for truing the wheels, it seems a single point grinder is what is needed. I am not sure there's any point in me getting an advanced version that faces off the tables as I only used eyeballing on aligning the table to the grinder wheels.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    As for truing the wheels, it seems a single point grinder is what is needed. I am not sure there's any point in me getting an advanced version that faces off the tables as I only used eyeballing on aligning the table to the grinder wheels.
    BC does make a good point, getting a flat surface on the dressed wheel requires the diamond to be drawn across it in a straight line. I made a rig quite similar to his and confess that it is one useful bit of having a good rest.

    Without a rest, a norbide stick, dressing stick or the spur wheel type of rotary spur imo would all be preferred.
    .

  7. #57
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    I got the T-style tool last night and it worked a lot better than I thought it would. But oh my god, the amount of dust and grit from this thing. I will be carrying this outside to use it until I get a vacuum permanently hooked up to this thing.

  8. #58
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    NONE of the stone dressing and truing tools is any less dusty. It's just the nature of the beast. I tend to wear my dust mask when grinding for anything other than a very short exposure. And even there I commonly hold my breath for the 15 or 20 seconds needed to hold back on the black snot booger syndrome. But the stone dressing throws up such a cloud that I always where the mask even if I could hold my breath and jump in for a pass or two then retreat to the other side of the shop for a fresh breath.

  9. #59
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    For regular bench grinder wheels, I use a star wheel dresser. Works well, does not tend to dull or cut the grains in the wheel.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    For regular bench grinder wheels, I use a star wheel dresser. Works well, does not tend to dull or cut the grains in the wheel.
    I like those too. But I found that they really didn't true up the diameter all that well unless used with the hooks over a tool rest spaced at the proper distance back. They do a lovely job for making the face even and breaks up the grains so the wheel cuts well. But if the wheel is wearing out of round I didn't find that the star wheel style does a great job of making it round and centered again.

    The star wheel also most certainly does break up the grains. It makes as much dust as a diamond option. After all that's how the grinding wheels sharpen. The grains break up or break away from the matrix and expose new sharp edges. If the wheel dulls or loads up then it's not the optimum wheel material for the job being done. One of my model flying buddies was a sales and tech rep for a local outfit that specialized in supplying grinding wheels and other abrasive products to industry. We had a couple of good chats on this over some beers at the model meets.

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