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Thread: OT, electric baseboard heat?

  1. #1
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    Default OT, electric baseboard heat?

    I am going to be adding electric baseboard heaters to the house. For the two small bedrooms upstairs I am putting one 1250 watt heater in each bedroom and I am going to feed them with 240v. I would like each room on its own thermostat. Does know if code allows for a single breaker in the panel to feed both of the thermostats? I know multiple heaters can run off of one thermostat I just don't know if you can run 2 separate heating circuits off of one breaker at the panel. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    There is nothing in the NEC preventing a single breaker of supplying multiple heaters as long as your load calculations are correct, wire is sized accordingly and overcurrent protection is adequate. Your heaters are simply a pair of resistive loads. It isn't done all that often because if the circuit has an issue anywhere it will disable all heat on that circuit. Then you may have both bedrooms without.

    Article 424 of the NEC addresses fixed electric space heating equipment.

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    Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching,
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching,
    1250 watts... $.25 cents an hour. Probably on for 4 hours per day so $1 a day or $30 a month to heat one room. Two rooms is ~$60 a month. Not bad.
    Work hard play hard

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching, Ca-Ching,
    Not really, entire house is currently heated with a pellet stove. I need a “real” heat source to sell it. These heaters will most likely never run except for testing as long as I live here.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxford View Post
    Not really, entire house is currently heated with a pellet stove. I need a “real” heat source to sell it. These heaters will most likely never run except for testing as long as I live here.
    Don't spend more than $100 on those heaters. Sounds like you'll loose it all when you sell it
    Work hard play hard

  7. #7
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    Yeah, only a dope would buy an electrically heated house in PA unless he was down with using the stove, in which case why bother? If you have gas, I'd put in a boiler and hydronic baseboard. PEX makes this SO easy now! If your basement joists are open you can even easily put in suspended PEX radiant, I did that for my kitchen which has an ancient terrazzo floor. Another cool hydronic trick is to use a toekick heater in a wall enclosure, lots of output without running it around the room.

  8. #8
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    Your two 1250 watt heaters total 2500 wats. Twelve gauge Romex at 240 volt is good for 4800 watts on a 20 amp breaker. Since a heater can be on for more than 4 hours (or is it three?) the code considers it a 'continuous load' and wants no more than 80% of that 4800 watts per circuit ( 3840 watts).

    That's the long answer to your question. Short is: yes, you're good.


    Cat

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxford View Post
    Not really, entire house is currently heated with a pellet stove. I need a “real” heat source to sell it. These heaters will most likely never run except for testing as long as I live here.
    It sounds like you are putting electric baseboard for the ENTIRE house and just questioning the circuit for the bedroom areas. Electric baseboard heat is the absolutely least desirable heat method for a house. It will be a major detraction in selling the house. Back in the 70's and early 80's a lot of new home builders used baseboard electric because it was the cheapest to install. That trend quickly ended when the word spread of the outrageous electric bills. Today, people tend to run, not walk, away from houses with electric baseboard heat.

    A second consideration is that today people just can't live without air conditioning and with no ductwork system it makes installation quite expensive. This is one of the main reasons that hot water boilers are not popular these days.

    I was in the HVAC business for many years and got many a call from people wanting to get rid of baseboard electric heat.

    ( 3 phase lightbulb's calculations are extremely optimistic, 8 hrs a day running is more realistic. AND calc was for only the two bedrooms.) For the entire house, expect the bill to be double that from better sources of central heat systems. Here is South Carolina, if the heat pump system fails (most common heat method), the system reverts to the backup electric heat elements and a $300 a month plus bill isn't unusual at all. Needless to say people get the heat pump repaired promptly !!

  10. #10
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    Heat Pump good so stay, electric heat bad so runaway.
    Work hard play hard

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