Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Marking barrels with caliber designation

  1. #1

    Default Marking barrels with caliber designation

    Okay smiths, how do you mark your barrels once you've cut the chamber? Hammer and dies? CNC milling? Laser?

    I'd like to get into a CNC mill for this and possibly some fluting later on, but the price point on a decent CNC that's big enough, let alone one with a 4th axis is prohibitive. I was considering doing a CNC conversion by starting with a reasonably priced mill from Precision Matthews, probably the PM30MV then later on get a conversion kit, add the 4th axis etc. That way I could get into a machine and use the manual functions for the projects that can be done with manual controls while I learn what I need for the CNC conversion and save up the money. Another option would be to get an already converted mill from someone like Procut CNC, but they only offer the PM25 size mill, and I think the slightly larger PM30 might be a little better suited to my needs. I know a purpose built CNC machine like a Tormach would likely be a much better option, but I don't want to spend that kind of money on a hobby, plus they seem to take up a ton of space and since I'm working in a converted 2 car garage, I need to save as much space as possible. Thanks in advance.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,206

    Default

    Metal stamps and a hammer.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    910

    Default

    Some years ago, I bought a replacement barrel in 44-40 WCF for a '92 Winchester from Numrich. The barrel had been roll marked on the surface but that process had left a noticeable bulge inside the barrel. They wouldn't refund my money so I left the original barrel on the carbine and eventually tossed the replacement.

    CNC or laser will put less stress into the barrel wherever the mark is placed. Just sayin'...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    South Louisiana
    Posts
    529

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Montezuma, IA
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    I use stamps and hammer, but with a LaBounty stamp guide, available from Brownells as their #521-104-000.
    David Kaiser
    “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
    ― Robert A. Heinlein

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks fellas, I'll probably start with a set of stamps, but eventually, I want to engrave them with CNC.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by txfireguy2003 View Post
    Thanks fellas, I'll probably start with a set of stamps, but eventually, I want to engrave them with CNC.
    No, you want the CNC machine and barrel ID is an excuse to get it.

    Electrochemical etching or laser etching are the technologies you want if you're really intended to mark barrels and other firearm identification.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,133

    Default

    Chemical etching does a nice job and is not expensive to get set up. Marking a barrel does not have the ATF requirements as a receiver.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    732

    Default

    You can etch pretty easily with a simple salt water bath and a car battery; it's not hard to etch .020-.050"+ deep in steel with this method, and it looks professional when done right. The stencils are the hard part for etching text. Freehand art is easy enough by just laying down a layer of some sort of plastic tape (even Scotch tape works fine) and cutting your art with a razor or Exacto blade.

    I've been looking for a place that can make me adhesive vinyl stencils for text about the size of what we see on the computer screen in this post; no luck yet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
    Posts
    5,443

    Default

    Yondering wrote: "adhesive vinyl stencils for text about the size of what we see on the computer screen"

    They used to make stencils that you could print on a laser printer. They were two layer, and whatever was printed stuck to the lower layer as it was fused. The upper layer was then peeled off as the stencil.


    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •