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Thread: Angle blocks - which style?

  1. #11
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    It is nice to proclaim that sine bars are for inspection only, but how do you do the shop work that requires setups to seconds of accuracy? How do you set up a taper in a lathe or how do you set a milling vise or a part in a grinder to get such accuracies?

    I agree that sine bars are not the best way for most shop work, in either home or commercial shops. Most work just does not need the level of accuracy that they are capable of. But when you do need that level of accuracy, then what else is capable of doing it? I addressed this question of accuracy in my article that I mentioned in post #2 above. When you get below 30 second (half minute) accuracy, I am sure that there are more expensive instruments or more precise angle blocks ($$$$$$$$$), but the sine bar with shop blocks is the most economical way to address the setup problem.

    As to replacing the shop blocks for use with the sine bar, the first thing that comes to mind is an adjustable parallel. It can be set with a common digital micrometer to the nearest tenth or two and, as Marv has pointed out, that should be OK for most work. But a set of quality adjustable parallels will probably exceed the cost of a set of shop blocks. Of course, you could just buy the adjustable parallels as you need them. I have one adjustable parallel that was purchased for a task and has come in handy a couple of times in addition to that original use. If you really need the ultimate precision, use a sine bar, get the shop blocks, and consider getting a 10 inch sine bar instead of the common 5 inch ones.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    the ones with the 90 degree seat, you described as offset V blocks are imo the most handy, at least I use them more often. Work is much less likely to move sitting in one in the vise or clamped to angle plate. Sine bars are imo an inspection tool or maybe for certain grinding setups, but less so milling.
    Paul A.

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    It is nice to proclaim that sine bars are for inspection only, but how do you do the shop work that requires setups to seconds of accuracy? How do you set up a taper in a lathe or how do you set a milling vise or a part in a grinder to get such accuracies?
    What I proclaimed was that that was my opinion, you're free to use them however you like. I included grinding in uses I would use the sine bar for and setting up a lathe and tool grinder is legit but I'll include that as inspection, vs work holding, i.e. you're checking something with it not using it an work set up. Where I said they are generally not use is milling (I said less so not never); If you're milling to seconds you're a better man than I.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 06-12-2018 at 10:10 PM.
    .

  3. #13

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    The little sine bar in the link is $11- pretty cheap.

  4. #14
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    It is but I can't find anything like it in the UK (so far) and I bet the shipping wrecks it. Otherwise I'd nab one as an "It's bound to come in handy" item. I do like the idea of it and an adjustable parallel is something I've been trying to justify for a while - trouble being, of course, that if you have one, you'll need/want the set.
    I thought I'd do the sensible thing - for a change - and see if it would work with my vise rather than just say "Ooo, SHINY!" and buy one. My vise is 3" wide but the base of it is only 1 7/8" wide which rather kills the idea of using that - I could stick a parallel across and then the sine bar and adjustable parallel and then the workpiece...but with a jaw depth of 1 3/8", it's going to fall out the top!
    So, if I've worked this out properly, I can do it more cheaply if I have a bigger vise...and a bigger mill to put it on....and a bigger workshop* to put that in.....and preferably in the US to avoid the shipping cost. I come up with the best practical solutions!

    *I already checked in a moment of lunacy and the next size of mill up from mine would stick out into the room enough to stop the door opening enough to get in easily as well as hit the lathe when winding the table to the left and the wall when winding to the right.

  5. #15
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    I use angle blocks with the 90 degree toe, or seat, pretty often in milling parts. If you set the toe end to a solid stop, then each part is always in the same exact place in x,y, and z. All you have to do is clear any chips, set the part in the angle block, and hold both against the stop as you tighten the vise.

    I make a lot of my own angle blocks by cutting the angle set by a wedge angle block. A set of those from 1 to 45 degrees can be had for a low price. Usually my toe angle blocks are made a few thou. thinner than the part they go with for full support, especially on wide parts. This also keeps the angle block from getting cocked in the vise, keeping the angle more accurate.

  6. #16
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    Has anyone used one of these? I've considered buying one a few times.

    Should be able to be set and checked with a sine bar outside the mill vise.

    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/75x25x32mm-T...wr~lYr5ok#rwid

  7. #17
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    Nov 2017
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    Not used one but if the height is 32mm, unless you've got a bigger vise than me (and most have, to be fair) very little of your part is going to be in the vise jaws.
    Had a look at the Kurt vise when someone posted their shiny new toy. Got as far as the price and decided I didn't like the...er...colour! That and when I measured out the size of it, realised it's just break my table and stick out far enough to smash the glass in the door when I opened it.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post
    I did briefly think that a sine bar would be cheaper (of the quality I'm likely to be looking at, at least) and offer more angles.....but then I remembered I'd need a set of gauge blocks to make it work. Unless there's a good way of doing it without...?
    Hi,

    Gauge blocks are nice, and I have owned a set for 25 years, but you don't really need them to use a sine bar. A quick bit of trig to figure out the height of the leg needed, then a small piece of scrap milled and/or ground to the correct size and Matilda is your uncle.

    I prefer the single home-made block to a stack of gauge blocks when I need to make multiple parts.
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post
    Not used one but if the height is 32mm, unless you've got a bigger vise than me (and most have, to be fair) very little of your part is going to be in the vise jaws.
    Had a look at the Kurt vise when someone posted their shiny new toy. Got as far as the price and decided I didn't like the...er...colour! That and when I measured out the size of it, realised it's just break my table and stick out far enough to smash the glass in the door when I opened it.
    The height of the fixed portion is 32mm I think, the depth of the V will vary with position, but is almost always quite a bit lower than that 32mm edge.

    I have a 2" deep vise so that solves that problem for me.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalee100 View Post
    Hi,

    Gauge blocks are nice, and I have owned a set for 25 years, but you don't really need them to use a sine bar. A quick bit of trig to figure out the height of the leg needed, then a small piece of scrap milled and/or ground to the correct size and Matilda is your uncle.

    I prefer the single home-made block to a stack of gauge blocks when I need to make multiple parts.
    With access to precision grinding equipment, I've made sets of sine standards for both 3" and 5" sine bars/plates. When I need a 5 degree angle, I just grab the block engraved '5', and I'm good to go. Don't even need to get the calculator out. Unlike angle standards, though, you CAN'T stack them to get in-between sizes.

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