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Thread: Lets start with Hello

  1. #61

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    Hey guys... New problem.... O was making some parts last night and needed to use a center drill to set for a live center and I noticed my tail stock seems to be just a tiny bit lower than the head stock center axis.......

    What can cause this???

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
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    5,777

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    Many possible causes, from wear to faulty construction to swarf in the ways to misalignment.

    In general, you need to ensure the quill is aligned with the headstock's axis, then raise or lower something. Shims can be used to raise the tailstock.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    Many possible causes, from wear to faulty construction to swarf in the ways to misalignment.

    In general, you need to ensure the quill is aligned with the headstock's axis, then raise or lower something. Shims can be used to raise the tailstock.

    Please elaborate.... I have not been around these machines for close to 7 years... My memory is a little fuzzy on the Nomenclature.....

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Flint, Michigan
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    665

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    On most lathes the tailstock can be adjusted sideways because it has a separate base plate. This allows for turning tapers of a small value. In between the base plate and tailstock casting shims can be placed to raise the tailstock. The quill of the tailstock must remain parallel with the bed when this is done. You need to be able to accurately measure the top of the tailstock ram when fully extended and make sure it is parallel with the bed. If your machine has been disassembled, shims may have been lost or misplaced.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Paine View Post
    On most lathes the tailstock can be adjusted sideways because it has a separate base plate. This allows for turning tapers of a small value. In between the base plate and tailstock casting shims can be placed to raise the tailstock. The quill of the tailstock must remain parallel with the bed when this is done. You need to be able to accurately measure the top of the tailstock ram when fully extended and make sure it is parallel with the bed. If your machine has been disassembled, shims may have been lost or misplaced.
    Gotcha..... where do I locate shims to put in it??

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
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    5,777

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    Shims are just thin pieces of metal. You can buy "shim stock" from tool suppliers and you cut it to size as needed. Some people just buy a sparkplug feeler guage from their local auto supplies and cut off the blades that match the thickness that they need. If you need size that you don't have, you can make up a "shim pack" from two or more blades. For instance to get .017 inches you can use two smaller blades, for example the .010 and .007 blades. Shims are generally just set in place.

    The quill is the part that slides in and out of the tailstock.


    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    665

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    As you will find when doing the shim adjustment, a shim in front will rotate the ram and tailstock clockwise. If it had started parallel to the tailstock, it is not now. Fixing that will now require a shim at the back end. Trig can save time, or just back and forth shimming until you've got it at the right height and as exactly parallel as you can measure. When you are done, though, the tailstock center will match the headstock with the ram both all the way extended and all the way retracted.

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Paine View Post
    As you will find when doing the shim adjustment, a shim in front will rotate the ram and tailstock clockwise. If it had started parallel to the tailstock, it is not now. Fixing that will now require a shim at the back end. Trig can save time, or just back and forth shimming until you've got it at the right height and as exactly parallel as you can measure. When you are done, though, the tailstock center will match the headstock with the ram both all the way extended and all the way retracted.
    It is kind of comical you mention Trig saving time.... in my case it would actually complicate things LoL.... Trig much like what I learned in the machining class years ago is EXTREMELY Rusty..... Thank god I have a sister in law that is a Math teacher...... ROFL


    In all seriousness if I run out the tailstock quill to the end of the rule machined into it and a Dial indicator on the carriage and followed the indicator up the quill My thinking is that should tell me if it is Parallel with the bed and if I line up the tail and the spindle AND get the tail stock parallel to the bed..... that should be the end result I am looking for Correct???

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,227

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    Basic trig for sine plates, setting compounds to exacting angles. Don't need to know trig, just specific formulas.
    Quote Originally Posted by FordFanatic1988 View Post
    It is kind of comical you mention Trig saving time.... in my case it would actually complicate things LoL.... Trig much like what I learned in the machining class years ago is EXTREMELY Rusty..... Thank god I have a sister in law that is a Math teacher...... ROFL


    In all seriousness if I run out the tailstock quill to the end of the rule machined into it and a Dial indicator on the carriage and followed the indicator up the quill My thinking is that should tell me if it is Parallel with the bed and if I line up the tail and the spindle AND get the tail stock parallel to the bed..... that should be the end result I am looking for Correct???
    Sent from my SM-G950U1 using Tapatalk

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by FordFanatic1988 View Post
    In all seriousness if I run out the tailstock quill to the end of the rule machined into it and a Dial indicator on the carriage and followed the indicator up the quill My thinking is that should tell me if it is Parallel with the bed and if I line up the tail and the spindle AND get the tail stock parallel to the bed..... that should be the end result I am looking for Correct???
    Yes. Although you need to indicate it in the vertical plane and check its not become cocked in that plane also. Also interesting to note how if you tighten the quill locks etc it affects readings.

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