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Thread: RG-G 1/2 Scale Gatling Gun Build

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    British Columbia
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    6,135

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartin View Post
    VPT, the OD on the bolt carrier is 2.750 inches. Thanks for the compliment there have been many compliments and I want to thank you all for that.
    Compliments coming from a group of guys like you all mean quite a lot.

    Dwight
    A build like this coming from a guy like you means the world for guys like us!
    Thanks Dwight.
    Damn good photography too.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Lancaster County PA
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    335

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    By the way Sparky I hope you post up a picture of the one that you built and the .357 that your'e working on now. I havn't been out in my shop for several weeks due to a family vacation and with the back problem I needed to recuperate from the vacation. I hope to get back out the shop tomorrow and get back to work on the gun.

    Here is a picture of installing the breech back plate.



    Scribing lines for laying out the work to be done on the back plate.



    Finishing the back plate machining.



    The back plate with the decocking switch.


  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Lancaster County PA
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    335

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    There is a "switch" that when held in the pulled position the bolts will not be cocked so you can rotate the crank without dry firing the gun if there are no rounds in the chamber.
    I call it the decocking switch but it is not a decocker in the real sense of the word. The knob shown above is upside down and when installed if pulled and twisted to keep the 3 pins out of the holes the gun will not cock and fire.

    Here is the cocking switch that when pulled with the brass knob above will not allow the firing pin to get pulled back by the cocking ring.



    Here is the cocking ring that holds the firing pin back until the barrel and bolt reach bottom dead center wher it fires.



    Here is a closeup of the pin being held back or "cocked". The black Delrin is just a spacer to align the cocking ring for installation.



    The frame and breech housing sitting close to where they will be when installed.


  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Lancaster County PA
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    335

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    A build like this coming from a guy like you means the world for guys like us!
    Thanks Dwight.
    Damn good photography too.
    Thank you Willy, it was very good of you to say that. And before one of you sharp eyed machinists notice that the cocking switch (I called it the decocking switch) that is shown leaning up against the mouse doesn't look like what is shown on the print that is visible on one of the other pictures. The cocking switch is not completed in the picture where it is on the desk leaning on the mouse. There is one screw up that doesn't affect the operation of the gun and will be left as is. Anyone who has built one may notice it, it visible on the last picture that I posted here this evening. I'll wait and see if anyone notices. Have a good one.

    Dwight

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,060

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    Nice work Dwight ! I have never posted pics on this site, its just too much of a pain. I do have a build thread in the DE section of the gat forum. Here is a vid of the bolts cycling, without the barrels. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0z9LEZ-H8xw The 357 gat is in design and coming along nicely, ordered some materials too. It will be a LOT easier after having built one before.

    A suggestion: put a little chamfer on the output edge of the cocking mechanism. It makes a world of difference cranking in reverse to clear jams etc. Without it, the bolts tend to catch on that edge.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
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    873

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    A build like this coming from a guy like you means the world for guys like us!
    Thanks Dwight.
    Damn good photography too.
    +1. Beautiful project and work.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX, USA
    Posts
    2,200

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    Quote Originally Posted by dmartin View Post
    Matt If I do get around to putting in a riser on the mill send a PM to see if you still have the material available,thanks.
    no problem. Looks like I'll probably get to mine over the winter holiday as there's enough projects ahead of it that I don't think I'll want to start it unless I can finish it before the end of the summer. I am getting close to finishing the treadmill motor install though and I'll post up a thread once I'm done.

    Once again, fabulous work, I enjoy every single picture and post!

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Lancaster County PA
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    It's been awhile so I thought I would add some more info and a few more pictures to this thread. I haven't been doing much in the shop lately due to a family vacation and back recuperation needed because of the driving for the vacation. I've been feeling guilty about not getting much accomplished and I think I'll soon run out of pictures to post until I get some more parts made. Also the work that I have gotten done in the last month (which was really only a few working days) is not making new parts but getting the gun to cycle properly. I was having trouble with getting all of the firing pin screws to be grabbed by the cocking ring reliably and just needed to spend enough time to figure out exactly what was going on inside without being able to actually see whats happening in there. As always after getting all of the problems solved, in hind site they were easy adjustments that needed to be made in order for it to work smoothly and reliably. I removed all of the shell extractors and put empty brass in the chambers so I could keep cycling the gun without dry firing it while figuring out what needed to be done. The gun now cycles very reliably and I'm glad that part is over. After getting the gap set correctly I still had problems with the firing pin hammer shaft screw not staying tight.

    The firing pin is fired by a spring loaded hammer shaft that has a 6-32 button head screw that is grabbed and then released by the cocking ring at bottom dead center. I have not had any luck getting that 6-32 screw to stay tight using Locktite though I have tried. I started out with low strength and proceed through medium to red high strength but they keep loosening after cycling the gun for awhile. Between each trial I cleaned the hammer shaft threads with a bottoming tap and the screw threads with the wire wheel on the grinder. Then cleaned them with carburetor cleaner, the type that leaves no residual oils and made sure both female and male threads were dry before adding Locktite and then reassembly. Tonight I ordered 1/16 spring pins as the final solution to keep the hammer shaft screw from backing out. Jerry, the guru on the Gatling Gun Forum that I think I mentioned earlier in this thread has had success and recommended using the roll pin method. I wish I would have done it from the get go but that is the 100% hind sight again. I was sure I could make it work with Locktite and sometimes being bullheaded is not a good thing. Anyway after the roll pins are installed I hope to not need to remove the recoil plate and work on the "innards" for a long time. One good thing about disassembling it so often is that I got very good at it. And I got pretty good at figuring out what is going inside of there without being able to see inside.

    I have a lot of pictures and figured I would post up some more that I haven't posted yet. As always have a good one.

    Dwight

    I soldered and bolted (screwed) the L brackets for fastening the frame to the breech housing. After soldering I drilled clearance holes in the L bracket and tap drill size holes in the breech housing. The tapped holes also are tapped into the (bolt cam) which allows for much more meat to thread into.



    Here is the frame bolted to the L brackets



    Here is a picture of assorted parts that also shows a side view of the frame/L brackets that I don't think I posted earlier



    Another picture of various parts including the crank and gear for rotating the main shaft


  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Lancaster County PA
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    Here is a picture showing the gun with the crank and gears installed and the breech backplate removed



    I know I posted this one earlier but it shows the 6-32 screw and hammer shaft that I've been having problems with



    Here is the breech housing with the L bracket soldered on



    Here is a picture of the cover plates that I made to cover the solder joint that looked like crap


  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Lancaster County PA
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    The last two pictures that I posted are to show the problem that I had with soldering the L bracket on. I used to think that solder just whetted the part but I think it was here on this forum that I had learned that there can be some mixing or alloying of the metals being soldered. The 3rd picture shows some divots that were created by using soft solder with brass at low temperature, probably less than 500 deg. F.
    I originally soldered from the bottom of the L bracket where any solder on the breech housing would have been covered by the frame after it was installed.

    While it was still clamped and hot I decided to add some solder on top that would wick into the tiny gap that didn't look bad anyway. If I would have left well enough alone it would have been fine and was looking good. Well of course some solder pooled at the seam and I quickly used a brass brush to remove it while it was still hot. That drove home the point about alloying of brass with soft solder. The brass I guess was dissolved at less than 500 Deg.F by the 60/40 soft solder which melts at 370 Deg. F. I then had to make up two cover plates to hide the crappy looking divots that had been left behind after the soft solder dissolved the brass when I brushed it away with a brass brush.

    Maybe someone with more knowledge than I can post up some more info and confirm that, that is indeed what happened. Thanks for any info.

    Dwight

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