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Thread: Welding: Getting a Start

  1. #21
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    There is a bit of adjustment for preflow and post flow amounts, but the tank does tend to last a fair time.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  2. #22
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    If your chosen model has a "Duty Cycle" look for a better unit.
    If you think CO2 isn't a suitable shield gas for things up to 1/4" fabrication, think again, the only difference between straight CO2 and a CO2/Ar mix is spatter cleanup.
    If you struggle setting your MIG up get some training, the chances it's you that are that you are rubbish, not your MIG
    If you get training and still can't make it work it's probable that you are cheap and did't spend enough money on good equipment.
    If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magicniner View Post
    If your chosen model has a "Duty Cycle" look for a better unit.
    In a single statement you have eliminated the majority of new arc welding systems under $5,000 as well as consumer grade O/A rigs. The Lincoln Invertec V350-PRO has a 60% duty cycle at 350 amps, and that's at 3/4 of it's max output! That's a $6,500 machine WITHOUT accessories.

    Acetylene tanks have a max draw rate which effectively act as a duty cycle for O/A welding.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  4. #24
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    They pretty much all have some sort of duty cycle. Asking for one that has none is unrealistic. (But the Lincoln 88A HD model does not quote a duty cycle , or any other spec.... must be it can do everything! )

    10% will be nearly unworkable unless you are just tacking stuff, or unless you will never work with max spec amps.

    Even 25% could be an issue if you expect to need max spec amps and weld long seams. But if max spec amps is well above what you need, then 25% would be workable nicely. There is always some dead time. Especially with stick welding.

    With wire welding, there is nothing to stop you except duty cycle, fatigue, or running out of wire, so it is easier to get in trouble with duty cycle.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    In a single statement you have eliminated the majority of new arc welding systems under $5,000 .

    My ESAB Smashweld 180 sets, designed as car bodyshop units, will run all day seam welding 1/8" plate at their highest voltage with 1.2mm wire without throwing a wobbly, modern sets within a 200A envelope tend to have a really rubbish Duty Cycle.
    Perhaps I should have qualified that with "That may affect your usage" but quite frankly it's indicative of "selling you less for more" with the new "super" switch mode systems, it seems a good old inductive PSU is in fact far better.
    If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magicniner View Post
    My ESAB Smashweld 180 sets, designed as car bodyshop units, will run all day seam welding 1/8" plate at their highest voltage with 1.2mm wire without throwing a wobbly, modern sets within a 200A envelope tend to have a really rubbish Duty Cycle.
    Perhaps I should have qualified that with "That may affect your usage" but quite frankly it's indicative of "selling you less for more" with the new "super" switch mode systems, it seems a good old inductive PSU is in fact far better.
    Wow, that's AMAZING. Truly astounding!

    Did you know that you can get the manual for that machine online? Page 4 has the duty cycle... 20% at max output voltage and only 140 amps. Your 100% duty cycle requires that you drop the amps to 63.

    It's not clear how you weld all day when welding 1/8 inch plate ( ~ 3mm) at the highest setting when table 1 shows that it's close to maxed out at 1/16 of an inch ( 1.5 mm).

    Yours is a truly amazing machine.

    Dan

    P.S. it might do fine on 16 gauge (.060 inch) for extended times, but that's not what you said.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magicniner View Post
    If your chosen model has a "Duty Cycle" look for a better unit.
    If you think CO2 isn't a suitable shield gas for things up to 1/4" fabrication, think again, the only difference between straight CO2 and a CO2/Ar mix is spatter cleanup.
    If you struggle setting your MIG up get some training, the chances it's you that are that you are rubbish, not your MIG
    If you get training and still can't make it work it's probable that you are cheap and did't spend enough money on good equipment.
    Virtually all welders have a duty cycle. Very few machines have 100% at their rated current.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by macona View Post
    Virtually all welders have a duty cycle. Very few machines have 100% at their rated current.
    I suspect there's a good reason for that. No matter what your output is at 100% continuous duty, there will always be higher settings you can do with the same hardware IF you do it for a limited time. Your competitors will, of course, sell the same machine with the much higher rating (at 10% duty cycle) and it will sell better.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    Wow, that's AMAZING. Truly astounding!

    Did you know that you can get the manual for that machine online? Page 4 has the duty cycle... 20% at max output voltage and only 140 amps. Your 100% duty cycle requires that you drop the amps to 63.

    It's not clear how you weld all day when welding 1/8 inch plate ( ~ 3mm) at the highest setting when table 1 shows that it's close to maxed out at 1/16 of an inch ( 1.5 mm).

    Yours is a truly amazing machine.

    Dan

    P.S. it might do fine on 16 gauge (.060 inch) for extended times, but that's not what you said.
    Ditto!! Nobody welds all day in a fab shop. Welding all day is a production line robot and even then there are pauses between work.
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

  10. #30
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    Oh, I have seen them, I used to be a miller tech. But they were big, big machines. But for hand use you dont need a long sty cycle.

    Typically the machines with a real high duty cycle are machines used for stuff like seam welding, automated arc gougers, and sub arc where they can be on a single operation for a long time

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