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Thread: Hydraulic Press Build

  1. #1
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    Default Hydraulic Press Build

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=f2xlAWytx9g

    I know some folks may not be a fan, but I noticed he made his main uprights out of 1/4" steel plate welded up into a box.

    I just made a deal on a small quantity of 4x8x1/4 A36 plate for about half local metal yard retail. I'm going to use one piece as the top for my welding table until I run across a good deal on something thicker. I decided to buy some extra just because the price was good enough to be worth sitting on it for a while.

    I've been want a little better hydraulic press for a while. I have pulled my 12 ton partially apart. I can still use it, but only above the torn metal. LOL. My 20 ton now has a bow on the top beam. That's what happens when you try to press a prop hub out in the wrong direction.

    Anyway, I was wondering if 1/4 plate really was adequate for the uprights on something like that. I have no need to make one as tall as stretch built his in the video. I won't have a joint in the pieces like he does, and I wasn't planning on going 50 ton. I've got a pretty beefy 30 ton cylinder and power unit off of a log splitter I was thinking about using for the hydraulic part. My 20 ton has been adequate for anything I needed to press except for the fact that I managed to bend it. I've also got some heavier stock for things like the top and table.

    Ok, tell me how stupid the idea of using 1/4 plate and making my own upright tube is.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  2. #2
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    Sounds like more work than using box tubing but i don't think it's stupid.

  3. #3
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    You seem to be a bit hard on presses. With that in mind, and wanting to use the steel you have, you might consider using 1/2" thick side plates on the uprights (the sides the pins go through) for your preliminary design and calculations. The 1/2" would be two layers of 1/4" plate, securely plug welded together. More work of course, but less work than repairing yet another mangled press.

    And check the pressure put out by the power unit and the bore of the 30 ton cylinder to make sure it is only 30 ton.

  4. #4
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    If I were to build one I would copy the KR Wilson which is made from flat stock. And that was my plan until I found a KR Wilson that I couldn't pass up.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cameron View Post
    You seem to be a bit hard on presses. With that in mind, and wanting to use the steel you have, you might consider using 1/2" thick side plates on the uprights (the sides the pins go through) for your preliminary design and calculations. The 1/2" would be two layers of 1/4" plate, securely plug welded together. More work of course, but less work than repairing yet another mangled press.

    And check the pressure put out by the power unit and the bore of the 30 ton cylinder to make sure it is only 30 ton.
    Yep. Pi * R * R * PSI. Already planned to include a high pressure gage.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  6. #6
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    north end of a southbound chicken is that not skipping on your fair on the old 46 bus of course if yeh looked like a wain or a wean or a young person you were entitled to halve the cost right away add to that a small dab of social insecurity with some acting like a modern 1960's pauper and a small tear in both of your eye's to show that the recipient of the ticket was not the first user of said card was about to pass oot from galloping mal-nyoo trushion one might right rightly expect a repoonsce of ach well dunny forget next time sonny boys all to then applaud of you'r pals cheering wildly as they too ambarked also without payinnn a penny.Ah the auld days Herr hoazie.Ps noa's a boyhy One such as I ever tried such a stunt mysell.Shamefull indeed.
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  7. #7
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    Like was mentioned, plug welds are your friend.
    And I think I might sleeve the table support holes if you are going with that type of design.

    Biggest thing I would be wary of is the welds.
    I would stick weld most all of it that is under any sort of load as opposed to MIG welding it.

  8. #8
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    Well... I went and picked up ten sheets of 4x8x1/4 steel plate. Price was pretty darn good. One piece will get used right away (as soon as I decided how at 327 lbs per piece) as the semi final top on my welding table. I would have preferred 3/8 or 1/2, but it wasn't presenting itself. I really didn't have the extra cash for this steel plate, but man its hard to pass up a good deal. Still haven't 100% convinced myself to build the press with it, but I already have two or three other projects in mind. I hate to "waste" it 30 or 40 foot solid one piece welded and ground steel work bench down the back wall of the shop just keeps picturing itself in my mind.

    Pretty much maxed out my old converted single axle boat trailer. Still had a little (a little) spring travel, but the tires looked up at me and asked, "WHY!?" Its a little over 300 miles from the yard to my shop. I was a bit afraid that the load and the heat would cost me a tire or two on the trip. I stopped three times about 30 miles apart to check my straps and feel the tires and wheel hubs for excess eat build up. The tires were no hotter than the tires on my truck, and at 100 miles out the wheel hubs were barely warm. Then I just locked the cruise control at 65mph and lit our for home. It was actually kind of soothing cruising along in the slow lane 10 mph under speed limit.

    The 6.6L turbo diesel kept asking me why we lollygagging around though. On one occasion I had to slow to 50 in a construction zone, and coming out my wife asked me if that felt good as we accelerated back to 65. I had just reset the cruise control and let it accelerate us to speed. I think she had thought I put my foot down. LOL.

    I was just taking it easy since the tires were maxed out. The truck didn't even know there was a trailer back there.



    My wife wanted to look at apiece of stone countertop in Phoenix, and I decided to make it a dual purpose trip. We drove from Yuma to Phoenix to look at her new countertop, and then from Phoenix to Nogales for the steel. I saved about $1400 over local steel yard price on the sheet, spent about $240-$250 on diesel for the trip, and did something with the wife that SHE wanted to do. The savings might have been a little less. They would have probably given me a small discount on 3200lbs, but usually I don't see any real discount on metal until I hit 5000lbs.
    Last edited by Bob La Londe; 08-14-2018 at 12:09 PM.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  9. #9
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    Now you need a buddy with some sort of torch, plasma or laser table to cut your parts!

    I suppose a decent hand held plasma cutter with templates and straightedge would get it done too.

  10. #10
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    I can slag metal pretty good with a torch and s straight edge. LOL. Got a buddy with a decent plasma cutter. He'ld loan it but I hate to borrow things. Been thinking about a metal cutting circular saw and a rail setup for this project. Won't be doing anything in a hurry though. All the extra steel ate up my play money for a little while.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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