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Thread: Unimat question

  1. #1
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    Default Unimat question

    I recently got a Unimat Sl-1000 and the t nut to hold down the tool holder fell apart in 5 pieces on me. Does anyone know where I can buy these at? All I need is one to make a few off of.
    Dave

    "I haven't failed,,,,,I have just found 10,000 ways that don't work" Thomas Edison

  2. #2
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    Is it just a standard thread Metric? Or https://unimat.homestead.com/
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainMan View Post
    ...the t nut to hold down the tool holder fell apart in 5 pieces on me.
    Five pieces? What's it made of, dried out plastic? Making T-nuts should be part of everyone's practical experience. It's not rocket surgery.

  4. #4
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    ..All I need is one to make a few off of.
    This last sentence tells me you've got a mill that you can use to make your own. If you've even got most of the pieces of the old one you shouldn't have any trouble designing a new one. Even if you didn't have the pieces you should be able to measure the T slot dimensions and design your own.

    Even if you don't have a mill and would be making a "top hat" shape then filing the sides down to make it fit the slot you should be able to fake it for now with something like a cut down nut or small scrap of steel that you thread to take the bolt. Then you can use the lathe to make the top hat which you then file to fit the slot.

  5. #5
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    The original Unimat Tee nuts are a poor design. It appears that they were turned on a lathe, not milled. I think the chief purpose of it was to make manufacture cheap and fast - in the 1950s. They were probably made on an automatic screw cutting machine (lathe). All my original ones are either broken or severely distorted. Here is the drawing that I have been working from to make new ones. I make then in strips and cut off the lengths that I need as I need them.



    The dimensions do not completely match the original Unimat ones, but they have proven a lot more durable in use. I haven't had to retire a single one of the replacement nuts that I made. Part of the reason for this is this design has a lot more steel in places where it beefs up the nut. The dimensions in my drawing are to allow the use of a 3/16" x 1/2" strip. Only the 1/2" width needs to be reduced: you use the full 3/16" height. Almost any steel alloy will suffice.

    And YES, it is a standard metric thread: M6. Almost all the threads on the Unimat are M6. The headstock spindle is a non-standard metric thread: M12-1. There is a chart of Unimat thread sizes here:

    https://unimat.homestead.com/
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 08-10-2018 at 02:54 PM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmgeorge View Post
    Is it just a standard thread Metric? Or https://unimat.homestead.com/
    Great site, Thanks for posting it
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way." George Patton
    "I don't believe in a government that protects us from ourselves".
    Ronald Reagan

  7. #7
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    AAAAND..... PAUL SLAM DUNKS THE BALL! ! ! ! The crowd goes wild ! ! ! !

  8. #8
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    Dang! Those are small.

  9. #9
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    And, on some that I have seen, parts such as that are made of something very much like zamak, which would certainly explain the "broke in 5 pieces" deal.
    1601

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    Hashim Khan

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post
    Dang! Those are small.
    So is the lathe! We're talking about something that overall fits easily into the footprint of a desktop 'puter's keyboard after all.

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