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Thread: Jet 1024 lathe... revisited

  1. #171
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    The tricky part is having your motor pulley be "in proportion" to your countershaft pulley so that the belt goes on both steps with the same tension.

    Perhaps paul463 would be willing to check his countershaft pulley sizes to see if it is the same as yours, if so then you need the same size steps on your motor pulley as his also.

  2. #172
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    Aug 2018
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    East Hampton, CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
    That's an A-size pulley. I'm pretty sure that the jack shaft pulley is B-size, but I won't swear to it. You definitely do not want to run an A belt on a B pulley - it'll bottom out and lose grip...
    So the pulley I purchased is not correct? How can I tell the difference between an A belt/pulley and B size. Just assumed it was all half inch standard size,

  3. #173
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    Jan 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by chesterspal View Post
    ... How can I tell the difference between an A belt/pulley and B size.
    Measure the pulley "opening". A is 1/2, B is 5/8. Drawing & dimensions here:
    https://tinyurl.com/y94qq7le

    Just assumed it was all half inch standard size,
    BTDT <G>

  4. #174
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    Jun 2014
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    Hurley WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1200rpm View Post
    The tricky part is having your motor pulley be "in proportion" to your countershaft pulley so that the belt goes on both steps with the same tension.

    Perhaps paul463 would be willing to check his countershaft pulley sizes to see if it is the same as yours, if so then you need the same size steps on your motor pulley as his also.
    Countershaft pulley diameters on mine; large side 9.450"od, small side 8.1"od. 5/8" wide grooves.

    I believe I posted the motor pulley sizes earlier in the thread.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  5. #175
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    East Hampton, CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
    Measure the pulley "opening". A is 1/2, B is 5/8...
    Yes, I see the difference, now. Was not aware there was more than one size for home power tools. Live and learn.

    So, back to square one. The three step pulley on my motor was size A so that belt must have been slipping like crazy.

    Yes, I have Paul's motor pulley dimensions. Thanks, Paul, for the countershaft sizes.
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-14-2018 at 07:13 AM.

  6. #176
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    Aug 2018
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    East Hampton, CT
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    Found someone who can supply two singles that should meet the size needed for the motor in the B format. Question is, can they be mounted back to back on the motor shaft... is there enough space. Will see.

    Leveling the lathe

    Was watching a video last evening about how critical it is to have your lathe perfectly level. Not doing so will cause the bed to twist creating a taper in your work. Fellow demonstrated this by turning at two points on an 8" piece if work. The diameters were off until he got his lathe bed leveled.

    Frankly, the way my lathes prior owner had this set up I cannot see how he could have done much with it. Between the wrong size drive belt to having it mounted to the rolling cart in his barn workshop, it must have been quite a challenge to use it with any accuracy.

    I have a machinists level that belonged to my grandfather, a tool and die maker. I was able to get this lathe perfectly leveled and bolted down to my bench yesterday.

    Have you folks done this with your machines?
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-15-2018 at 07:37 AM.

  7. #177
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    Dracut, Massachusetts
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    The short answer is Yes, you should level your lathe and most everyone here has. Most put a fair amount of effort into doing so.

    On the flip side, you can drive yourself crazy chasing perfection. So at some point you need to determine what level of "perfection" you are after.

    For a bit of perspective, I rather like the little essay called "In praise of klunkers" on this site:

    http://www.mermac.com/index.html (Some other interesting reading there as well)

    The guy who posted this was in the machine dealing business for a while and has some decent insight. What he talks about here is one end of the spectrum, while at the other end you have guys who make a long term hobby of getting the last possible smidgen of precision out of whatever machine they have. There is no real right or wrong here, just where you personally want to invest your efforts.

    My point being that the previous owner of your lathe may have been able to do everything he happened to need to do with that lathe just as it was. It's all a matter of what your needs and expectations are.

    But yeah, do level your lathe...

  8. #178
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    Aug 2018
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    East Hampton, CT
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    I picked up one of these X Y milling tables from Harbor Freight. It made more sense to me than trying to rig up an adaptor for my lathe down the road. Besides, I needed one now to fix the poor machining in the tail stock locking plate I bought from Grissly.



    It actually worked quite well. Those that have purchased these claim you need to take it apart and do some finishing of the rails and such. I would agree. It is hard to use right out of the box. With a bit of elbow grease and other grease it should be a nice addition to my shop. Well worth the $60 (w/20% off coupon) it cost. I would have paid more than that to have a machine shop fix this plate.

    I would add, the better the drill press you own the better this will work for you. My press is rather small but it still worked fine.

    Question: is there an adaptor for a drill press that substitutes for the chuck to hold milling bits? I had an issue with the bit loosening up from the force of the cutting.
    Last edited by chesterspal; 09-18-2018 at 09:56 AM.

  9. #179
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    Oct 2012
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    San Antonio TX, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by chesterspal View Post
    Question: is there an adaptor for a drill press that substitutes for the chuck to hold milling bits? I had an issue with the bit loosening up from the force of the cutting.
    I used one of those on my Walker Turner for several years before I got a mill. Worked okay and I did a lot of projects with it, but was slow and frustrating. My DP has a male JT33 taper and a lockring to push the chuck off - a friendly guy on here or one of the other forums sent me a 1/2" collet chuck that matches the taper and has a threaded ring to hold it on. That worked pretty well, though it still chattered like crazy and occasionally loosened itself.

    If yours has a similar set up, that's an option that would work. If it has an MT2 or 3 female taper then you can buy ER25 chucks for not much money which would do a much better job of holding endmills than a drill chuck. It still won't be great, but it's better than nothing!

  10. #180
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    Missouri
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    I guess those vises work, but for very little more money I got a full x-y table.

    The table is nicer than a vise, because you can put nearly anything on it, just like a mill table, and still can clamp a vise on it also. I usually keep a drill press vise on my x-y, but it is easy to take off when I want to deal with something larger than the vise will handle,

    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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