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Thread: Project Log: DIY Film Camera

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    I think thats similar to my new drawing from #25, right? I like the look of that new design and I think it would work well, and not be difficult to do.

    I know some cameras use a full on groove when they have the means to do it simply, like some die cast metal cameras.

    Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
    Yes, looks like your new design uses stacked plates with different opening sizes in the rear standard, the gg/film back would fit into the largest opening of the stacked rear standard plates.
    Just remember light doesn't like to bend, not naturally anyway, the right angles coupled with a flat black paint or black anodizing would make it light tight.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Brampton, Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcfx View Post
    Yes, looks like your new design uses stacked plates with different opening sizes in the rear standard, the gg/film back would fit into the largest opening of the stacked rear standard plates.
    Just remember light doesn't like to bend, not naturally anyway, the right angles coupled with a flat black paint or black anodizing would make it light tight.
    Thanks, makes sense.

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  3. #33
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    Jul 2016
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    Brampton, Ontario
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    Tonight's work was roughing out the wood frame for where the film holder goes.

    Used the mill to cut slots which will give the thumbnuts a recess to go in and room for fingers. Please don't report me to the 'Port Authority for mill abuse.

    Next step will be some of the sheet metal parts, I'm going to screw them down to a sacrificial board and mill them out by the numbers with the DRO.

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  4. #34
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    Jun 2005
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    Almost Dallas
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    I suggest that you reinforce the joints where you have glued end grain.

  5. #35
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    Jul 2016
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    Brampton, Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by john hobdeclipe View Post
    I suggest that you reinforce the joints where you have glued end grain.
    All the wooden pieces will soon be reinforced with 1/8" aluminum sheet.

  6. #36
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    Jul 2016
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    Tonights progress:

    Roughed out the three main sheets that go in the area where the back meets the rear standard. Couple goofs but nothing fatal, most of them can be covered up.

    I clamped the aluminum plate to a sacrifical plywood board and milled it out using the DRO.

    The only other large plate like that is the piece that clamps the bellows in place. That may actually be better served as 4 separate pieces to make it more managable to install and work the bellows into place without having to hold it in all locations simultaneously. Same goes for the front ones.

    Speaking of bellows, I bought an old leather soft sided briefcase at the trift store for $6 which I think will have more than enough pieces of leather to make a bellows from. I have to play around with it a bit to make sure, and also find some dark cloth for the inside lining.

    The wooden part for the back is looking good, but the dimensions are off a touch. I don't think it'll be a problem though.



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  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthegamer463 View Post
    Speaking of bellows, I bought an old leather soft sided briefcase at the trift store for $6 which I think will have more than enough pieces of leather to make a bellows from. I have to play around with it a bit to make sure, and also find some dark cloth for the inside lining.
    You may want to make a brown craft paper prototype of your bellows to make sure that you have enough material for pleated bellows.
    I'm sure you know bellows have to collapse into a very small space, the material has to be very thin and as light tight as possible,
    usually double layers, a leather or artificial leatherette outer layer and a second inner layer with stiffeners sandwiched in between.
    You would have to check that the old briefcase leather isn't peppered with pin holes from age, it's most likely too thick.
    Bag bellows may work better for you if you don't have a lot of extension.

    Here's some links that may help you if decide to go the expensive route for bellows -

    Thorlabs - BK5 blackout cloth .005" thick, this material is vinyl coated nylon cloth, single layer isn't that light tight but with a outer
    bellows skin it's pretty good, glue with vinyl cement.

    https://www.thorlabs.com/newgrouppag...ctgroup_id=190

    There is another material that's used for bellows in pneumatic organs and player pianos
    it's a very thin black rubberized cloth ( approx .008" ), I bought some from Player Piano Company in Kansas
    to restore some focal plane shutters and to make bellows for my view camera restorations, I think they went out of business I'm not sure.
    I'll dig around for their phone number. In the meantime Google for - pneumatic bellows cloth

    Columbia Organ Leather - Extra thin tanned leather .008" thick

    http://www.columbiaorgan.com/col/skins.htm#CML

  8. #38
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    Jcfx, from his first post....

    I'm using a Schneider Super Angulon 65mm f5.6 lens....
    Now some of that is taken up by the frames so it's likely that the bellows only needs about 2.5 to 3" of extension. And I figure that's about right for a bag bellows. So no need for multi layers and stiffeners as would be used in a typical pleated bellows.

    Excellent points on the need for leather with no pin holes though. That might let out the idea of just using stock from Tandy or similar.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Now some of that is taken up by the frames so it's likely that the bellows only needs about 2.5 to 3" of extension. And I figure that's about right for a bag bellows. So no need for multi layers and stiffeners as would be used in a typical pleated bellows.

    Excellent points on the need for leather with no pin holes though. That might let out the idea of just using stock from Tandy or similar.
    Matt's bellows whether they're pleated or bag style should be a bit larger to account for any rise/tilt etc. 2.5 - 3" is almost exact to the focal length at infinity
    I'd do a mock up to make sure that the bellows would accommodate all the camera movements before committing to making the final bellows.

    Most leathers will have pinholes since it's a natural animal skin, a double layer helps.

  10. #40
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    A mockup is a great idea. It could easily be just done with any sort of semi stiff fabric.

    I never had a rail or short focal length bed camera myself but I read a lot about them. For the short focal length lenses like he is using the simple pillow style bag bellows is the preferred option since it allows for more freedom of shifts and tilts without binding like a pleated regular bellows would do on as short a bellows as he needs. And yeah the bag bellows ends up being a little larger than the frames of the camera itself to supply the degree of shift needed and not bind. And as you suggest a mock up in cheap towel like fabric or similar would soon show the size needed to get the extension needed for close up work and to allow for the degree of shift and tilt to get the job done.

    I know that there is also a coated blackout cloth. Got some here in fact. Bonding this style of cloth to a single layer of leather might serve the purpose well. The cloth provides the blackout needed and is not very thick and the leather is self supporting enough to aid with not wanting to slump down and get into the way. At least it could be one plan of attack. There's certainly more than one road to Rome after all.

    It might be nice to have the option of swapping the bellows in time as other lenses with shutters come available. I know I've got an old shutter and an antique uncoated lens here that was intended for a larger format camera of the day. Always wanted to try it on SOMETHING to see if the old optics would give a nice dated/vintage looking picture. Never got around to it though. It's a longer focal length so a telescoping front and rear box would be an option which would be simpler to make. I'd just be giving up the ability to shift and tilt. But for basics it could be fun. I'd likely go with the trick of using print paper for the negative though. Then face to face papers to get the final print from the paper negative.
    Last edited by BCRider; 09-16-2018 at 03:48 PM.

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