Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: proper use of jumper cables

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post

    But this discussion makes me wonder if it would be a good idea to break the jumper cables in half and install a connector there. Pull it apart before connecting and pull it apart again before disconnecting. But where to get a connector with a high enough current rating? I thought of a stage pin connector, but they are rated at 20 Amps and perhaps 30 or 50. I don't think that would be enough. I've seen a starter motor hard pin a 500 Amp meter so I probably need several hundred Amps. And is this even a good idea?
    Or you could just install heavy duty switch to the cables.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,160

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    Don't any of you folk have sealed/low maintenance batteries in your cars yet?
    Even sealed batteries still have open vents for the hydrogen gas that can be produced. They just use caps that are not readily removable.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mihit View Post
    I consider the chances of an hydrogen explosion from a modern battery are very slim. I always hook up battery to battery. The only thing on modern cars I've been told is to turn the headlights on the dead one before jumpering, to prevent a current inrush that could cook the computers.
    +1 In over 40 years of dealing with lead acid batteries never had one explode. And although there have been times I've connected the - jumper cable to ground on the engine block (or similar) that's a rarety. More often than not I connect straight to the terminals and never had an issue. I DO wear safety glasses though when dealing with batteries, jumpers etc "just in case" and always have.

    We did have a prototype gizmo at work that had a lead acid battery installed inside a mostly sealed metal box along with some switches and wiring. One of the techs in the shop turned it on after it had been charged which caused an arc inside the sealed area with the battery - BOOM! It blew a steel access panel clean off the side of the unit and threw it across the room. Fortunately he was standing on the other side of it when he hit the switch. That POS unit went back to the vendor for rework. A real amateur design mistake, probably by some cut rate "design engineer."

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Back in the day I used to help my friend that owned a gas station. People would call and say they had a dead battery. We would go out and they would have a car pulled in forward in a single car garage. We would pull up and touch bumpers, connect both jumpers together in one long jumper, and hook it to the positive battery terminal. I guess that is out with today's cars.

    I remember too you had to be careful with cars like a 1957 Ford because it had positive ground. Lots of sparks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
    I remember too you had to be careful with cars like a 1957 Ford because it had positive ground. Lots of sparks.
    + ground was common on old English cars and motorcycles too.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    29,309

    Default

    The cases of battery explodion or burndown I have seen have been connections in wrong polarity...

    Saw one with a new Corvette and a beater car.... nasty smoke drifting off downwind. New corvette was probably a write-off due to all electronics plus considerable wiring being well fried.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13,815

    Default

    that would most likely come down to whoevers the car with the good battery wins the battle - of course shear capacity can help as in cold cranking amps even in a slightly discharged battery having the bigger buffer can keep you being the one that has the final meltdown... but most likely not if the other car is also running it's alternator at the time...

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    West Michigan
    Posts
    2,835

    Default

    The main threat to explosions while jumping cars and trucks is that the dead battery is boiling a lot of hydrogen out. The car that is being used as a source of power isn't a problem as the car that has been running has a fully charged battery and has very little if any hydrogen being made. Cars are designed to run the electrical off of the alternator/generator once they are started. The charge used in starting the engine is replaced and then the battery is just there to start it later. If the alternator didn't fully run the car the battery would often be dead.

    So it just makes sense to make your last connection when jumping a vehicle the negative cable of the charging vehicle and when unhooking them unhook the same negative cable from the charging vehicle first.

    Brian
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    4,599

    Default

    I usually use an old Schauer battery charger on my 1989 Toyota truck when the battery gets low (due to 40 mA parasitic drain), but sometimes I use my Harbor Freight booster. One time I somehow hooked it up backwards, and it just popped a fuse. It does have a main power switch so any arcing is contained in the plastic enclosure.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    3,279

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bborr01 View Post
    ... So it just makes sense to make your last connection when jumping a vehicle the negative cable of the charging vehicle and when unhooking them unhook the same negative cable from the charging vehicle first.

    Brian
    Brian,

    Your procedure is the reverse of the instructions which came with my cables (see OP), but what you say makes sense.
    Allan Ostling

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •