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Thread: It had to happen sooner or later. A suprising set up.

  1. #11

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    I've done alignment using chordless phone intercom, one monitoring tone at TV and the other at the dish. Beats dragging TV and cables to antenna location.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by machinist60 View Post
    I've done alignment using chordless phone intercom, one monitoring tone at TV and the other at the dish. Beats dragging TV and cables to antenna location.
    On the little dishes we used a signal meter to tweak it. Its basically just a subjective scale DC voltmeter. One day one of my guys called me and said he couldn't get any signal, and he had walk checked the install from end to end. I came out and asked him what was going on. He said, "I hooked up the meter and no matter how I adjust the dish the meter just drops."

    Blink! Blink! Blink!

    "Dude, you were on the satellite to start with. Did you walk inside to see if you had a picture?"
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  3. #13
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Using any type of satellite system for internet is kind of like ordering Pizza from another country and getting it delivered. By the time it arrives, it's cold, moldy, and there isn't any value left
    That is a very idiotic response. First off I CAN order a pizza from another country and have it at my door in twenty minutes. Secondly my DSL line will only deliver .320mbs where I live. My satelite delivers 18 to 25mbs. The satelite is by far the better solution. Those are my only options at this time. I don't need the internet for business or for managing my portfolio so what I have is fine.

    And why do you live in such a small house. My God man save up a few bucks and get a real house.
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Forest View Post
    That is a very idiotic response. First off I CAN order a pizza from another country and have it at my door in twenty minutes. Secondly my DSL line will only deliver .320mbs where I live. My satelite delivers 18 to 25mbs. The satelite is by far the better solution. Those are my only options at this time. I don't need the internet for business or for managing my portfolio so what I have is fine.

    And why do you live in such a small house. My God man save up a few bucks and get a real house.
    The kids complain about a 10ms latency over here when playing online multiplayer games.

    Small houses are nice. The big houses around here cost way too much.
    Work hard play hard

  5. #15
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    Ahh ha! So you wrote the manual. Now I know who to blame.

    Some decades ago I was working for a TV station in Miami and I had a project going to add a remote control to a big satellite dish (5 or 6 meter). So I am working the midnight shift at the transmitter site which was where that dish was installed and I did some experiments with my new system and somehow lost the memory which stored the satellite positions. It is like 2AM and that dish was needed around 7AM for the morning shows. PANIC! And no one to call. I tried to find a satellite for a starting point and that was hard enough. Getting a positive ID on it was equally difficult. But then, FOLLOWING THE INSTRUCTIONS, it would not move to the next position on the arc. I could not locate a second satellite. A big dish like that literally has a very small beam or angular view so you needed to be within a fraction of a degree to see anything. I was literally out there with angle gauges on the moving dish trying to get even an inkling of a signal. It took me literally hours to discover that the internal calibration constants were off by almost a factor of two. I was only moving around half way between the satellites, but not exactly so two jumps also did not work. Like I said, PANIC!

    I finally found a second one with a lot of small jogs and was able to deduce the new factor needed and stored it in the memory and then was able to move from one to the next along the arc. I think I had it back in operation with only 45 minute or so to spare. But the instructions in the manual were WRONG, WRONG, WRONG! And I guess the factory guys who installed it didn't bother to tell us or to correct the manual.



    Quote Originally Posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    Darryl,

    How many dishes did you install? I started out installing 12 footers, then 8 foot dishes in the 1980s for my dad's business. With those old 8' one piece Echosphere dishes, if I installed it on a straight pole and did everything the same way every time I usually only had to swivel it on the pole a little to nail the entire arc and hit all the satellites.

    In the 1990s I was personally installing as many as 4 systems a day with Primestar (and some RCA DirecTV systems when we could get them), had three full time installers who did on average 2 systems per day each, and my dad was doing periodic installs for me as well. After a while if I did the install right I'd get signal on power up 9 out of 10 times. Sometimes one of the guys would call me because he was struggling so I'd go help. I'd do a walk through from end to end, find anything they forgot, and then point the dish. One day Chuck Farnsworth asked me how in the heck I was able to do that. I pointed up in the sky and said, "See that little dot? Just point the dish at it and you are good."

    Many years later another one of my installers (and long time friend John Apple) and told me they used to sarcastically joke that I didn't install systems. I just threw out the window of the truck and they assembled themselves in the air and landed on the roof.

    What they didn't realize is there was no manual for installing those systems. I decided the guys needed one with a step by step decision tree for everything, so I wrote the manual they were installing from. I told them if it wasn't in the manual call me and tell me what step the installation jumped out of the manual, and if a system doesn't work just go back through the steps in the manual. I didn't just know how to set the systems up. I wrote the manual.

    loose nut

    Anyway, the more often you do it the more often you will nail it. I still don't get lucky very often with setting a vise, or an indexer, but I get it a lot closer now than I did a few years ago. Sounds like you have done it a few times now and you are starting to be able to see that dot in the sky. If you look close you can see its actually a little cluster of dots. LOL.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Ahh ha! So you wrote the manual. Now I know who to blame.

    Some decades ago I was working for a TV station in Miami and I had a project going to add a remote control to a big satellite dish (5 or 6 meter). So I am working the midnight shift at the transmitter site which was where that dish was installed and I did some experiments with my new system and somehow lost the memory which stored the satellite positions. It is like 2AM and that dish was needed around 7AM for the morning shows. PANIC! And no one to call. I tried to find a satellite for a starting point and that was hard enough. Getting a positive ID on it was equally difficult. But then, FOLLOWING THE INSTRUCTIONS, it would not move to the next position on the arc. I could not locate a second satellite. A big dish like that literally has a very small beam or angular view so you needed to be within a fraction of a degree to see anything. I was literally out there with angle gauges on the moving dish trying to get even an inkling of a signal. It took me literally hours to discover that the internal calibration constants were off by almost a factor of two. I was only moving around half way between the satellites, but not exactly so two jumps also did not work. Like I said, PANIC!

    I finally found a second one with a lot of small jogs and was able to deduce the new factor needed and stored it in the memory and then was able to move from one to the next along the arc. I think I had it back in operation with only 45 minute or so to spare. But the instructions in the manual were WRONG, WRONG, WRONG! And I guess the factory guys who installed it didn't bother to tell us or to correct the manual.
    LOL. I didn't write "that" manual. I specifically left out all the regional stuff that would just confuse my guys. On the old C-band dishes as long as I got the same mount I would just count the threads on the elevation screw. Of course I was doing fixed terrestrial mounts on a steel pole set in concrete that I had made sure was perfectly level when I set it. Mobile installations were much more of a pain. Once we started installing automatic positioners I still would take a hand crank with me that was marked with all the satellites. I'd install that first, dial in the arc, and then switch to the power jack.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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