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Thread: Fabricobble Hinge

  1. #1
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    Default Fabricobble Hinge



    So who among you has made a quick and dirty fabricobble hinge like this? What issues did you have? How did you space it so the hinge rounds didn't rub?

    If you have watched many fabrication of cool gadgets videos on YouTube I'm sure you have seen this type of hinge or pivot made. I've done it a couple times, and mostly I've gotten lucky, but on a recent fabrication where I took the time to lay everything out properly the inherent flaws in this method of hinging something bit me and I had to cut it all off and grind it flat again to start over.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  2. #2
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    Easy Answer

    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  3. #3
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    Over the years I've made hundreds of hinges using pipe or tube and a solid rod. Unless the fit between tube and rod is really
    tight they'll work better if you use three pieces of tube--two on one side of the hinge and one on the other. For the most
    part "interference" of the hinge with the opposite part is not an issue. Weld the hinge parts on one side only to begin with and
    that's usually enough--they'll lift up a bit and provide some clearance. If you're shooting for a really precise fit put a bit of shim
    stock under each side before welding. Don't overthink this--it's just a hinge...
    Keith
    __________________________
    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

  4. #4
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    I did have a problem I had the last time I did one like that. I used a pivot pin that was a close fit. Once the parts were welded they deformed enough that the pin would not come out without driving it from the end. I'd made the other mistake of partly covering the hole in the end with weld. Had to grind that off to get a drift in to get the pin out.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  5. #5
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    The standoff spacer is removed afterwards. If it is tight or distorted drive out the pin. A shim or spacer needs to be on both sides and roughly equal. A flat piece will be difficult to hold in a good consistent orientation. A flat piece of metal bent to fit might not be easily removable after tacking. Wire shims bent to fit might come out easier, but might be harder to hold in place. The round standoff almost falls off, and is easily held in place by gravity if welding on the weld table.

    2 vs 3 is a side issue.

    If desired weld the pin in place afterwards.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  6. #6
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    So basically you seem to be saying the spacer solves the problem. It effectively gives you some clearance between the moving plate and the tube if the end problem was rubbing there. Seems like a better solution than trying to chamfer the edge of the flat plate.

  7. #7
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    If you aren't a great welder (I'm not), you might try what I've done, which is to weld a longer section of tubing to the edge of a piece of flat steel, then cut it in 3 pieces, flip the middle piece around, put a rod through the tube, then weld the flat steel down. I find it's easier to clamp & weld the flat piece in place so it doesn't move than welding 3 pieces of tubing to the edge of something, while keeping the tubing nicely in line, and without my welding pulling the tubing one way or the other.

  8. #8
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    I as well have made a number of different style hinges. Pictured below is about the quickest dirtiest I make for trailer gates.








    I use a piece of filler wire for spacing out the barrels.

    If you're hanging the hinge vertically a teflon or brass washer between the barrels really helps them work smooth.
    Andy

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpt View Post
    I as well have made a number of different style hinges. Pictured below is about the quickest dirtiest I make for trailer gates.

    I use a piece of filler wire for spacing out the barrels.

    If you're hanging the hinge vertically a teflon or brass washer between the barrels really helps them work smooth.
    Very nice.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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