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Thread: Sherline, Logan, Southbend, Shedon, Atlas... Great hobby Lathes,

  1. #1
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    Default Sherline, Logan, Southbend, Shedon, Atlas... Great hobby Lathes,

    Many others I suspect?

    Pick and choose.

    What is Your perfect HSM lathe?? JR

    Ahh.. Sheldon.
    Last edited by JRouche; 10-15-2018 at 01:58 AM.
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  2. #2
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    For me it is the lathe that is operational. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  3. #3
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    Clearly a 10EE. That would satisfy most all of my wants in the 24" length category.

    Most of the rest would be handled by adding a 36" Bullard

    Those other brands are not all "hobby"......

    Atlas of course truly IS "hobby".

    But I bought a mill from an operating screw machine shop..... filled with manual screw machines, every one of them a Logan. Browne and Sharp used to make tooling specifically FOR Logan. Logan, aside from the Wards lathes, was sold into the same markets as SB, Sheldon,

    Sheldon was never really "hobby", they were more in the area of Clausing and above. Southbend sold into the repair market for decades, until that sort of repair became a thing of the past.

    Sherline? Hard to say.... used by watch and clock repair folks, factories making small precision parts, etc.

    I suppose every one of the list would be described by some hereas "mere toys"..... But we have already disposed of that issue.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  4. #4
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    I wish that I could say. I've used several of the SIEG models, and looked at several others but that hardly makes me an expert.

    I find that my 7x12 has some features that I really like. The variable speed motor is nice, so I'd like that on whatever would replace it. The plainback mount system (three screws through the spindle flange) sort of sucks compared to a camlock D-1 but it does not spin off when in reverse, so it's a little better than a threaded spindle nose. I like that I can reverse the motor separately from the change gear train so it can cut left hand threads, cut on the front or back, etc. I'd want that on the new one too. The chucks are 3, 4 and 5 inch, so they are very manageable. I like the fact that I don't need a crane to swap chucks. I also like the cam operated tailstock lock.

    The 9x20 has a few features that I really like. The "fine power feed" is quite handy, and I'd like to have one for the cross feed also. The QC gear box is only one stage (9 threads) , so I'd prefer a Norton style two stage gearbox (9 x 4 or more threads) so that gear changes are even fewer. I really like the versatility of the cross-slide with T-slots just in case I ever need to mount a second tool post, do some milling or some line boring. So the ideal would include power crossfeed, longitudinal feed, multi stage QCGB and T-slots.

    Hmmm. What else would I want. Since it's a small shop, I would want it to be moveable. My 7x12 is bolted to a bench. The 9x20 is on the OEM stand which is on a (ducking) mover's 4 wheel furniture dolly. I'd want it to be somehow movable so that I could move things past it once in a blue moon.

    So there's the simple list. Variable speed spindle. Easy on/off chuck. Chucks less than 20 lbs for smaller stuff. Chuck that does not spin off. Dual stage QCGB. Power feeds in all axis. Versatility from t-slots on the cross slide. Reversable motor and reversable gear train. Tailstock cam-lock.

    I did not include the easily added options. A QCTP is nice, as are rests, carriage stops and locks.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  5. #5
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    Smart & Brown
    Harrison L5
    Colchester Chipmaster
    Colchester roundhead Student
    Colchester Bantam
    CEV copy of a Monarch 10EE
    Hardinge
    ........not a Myford...........

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    ........not a Myford...........
    I only have a Myford :-(

  7. #7
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    This would be my perfect HSM lathe: http://www.grizzly.com/products/Griz...ad-Lathe/G0709

    In the meantime, I'm saddled with the 1939 12x36 Atlas/Craftsman Deluxe I restored about 13-14 years ago. It's done everything I've needed except threading. The change gears are such a PIA, I use taps and dies.

  8. #8
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    Iím more concerned finding enough large hobby budget and garage ;P

  9. #9
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    [QUOTE=CCWKen;1199238]This would be my perfect HSM lathe: http://www.grizzly.com/products/Griz...ad-Lathe/G0709


    I bought one about three months ago. Happy with the lathe, unhappy with the light duty steady rest. And the under engineering with the taper attachment.
    The attachment is fine but I have to modify the splash guard to get full travel of the carriage. That should have caught at the factory.

  10. #10
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    Sheldon 11" with the long bed or a Hendy 14 or 16" geared head.

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