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Thread: Black oxide experiment

  1. #21
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    Jan 2014
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    Long Island, N.Y.
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    2,560

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    Thank you, there's a lot of good information in that answer. Might be worthwhile to add a copy of that to your original post.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    30,087

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    It seems the major issue in the US is obtaining the AN without getting put on all manner of annoying "lists", or worse. OK if you use large quantities for fertilizer (where quite a large amount could go missing without trace), ironically it is harder to get in small amounts which would be of no particular use in any illegal activity.

    Such are laws.

    I have been using the "heat to a black heat and dunk in old oil" method, which obviously is of use only on parts that are not already heat treated. This seems to give a good surface color, and is much less likely to damage any but the very hardest steels.

    I actually have plenty of the "additives", but none of the active ingredient.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Thank you, there's a lot of good information in that answer. Might be worthwhile to add a copy of that to your original post.
    You are very welcome! And a good idea....I shall add the info regarding reaction and storage vessels to the original post. There are so many aspects I tend to forget to mention some....

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
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    183

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Manganese parkerizing the name I was after. Been bit of lottery how it works.
    I don't have abrasive blasting at hand so that could be one reason to fail..

    Do you use homebrew manganese parkerizing solution or ready one from Brownels or similar?
    I have done this a few times, but I have access to a blasting cabinet so thew surface can be properly prepped. I made my own but I can't remember the recipe, can probably find it.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New England
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    1,214

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    A few Amazon sellers are offering "Cold Pack Kits" that contain ammonium nitrate 'prills' - here's a specimen (10 pounds/$24.99 delivered):

    https://www.amazon.com/Instant-Cold-.../dp/B07CZK913Y

    Is this form suitable for bluing?

    The reader's comments suggest that the seller above doesn't have the best quality control.

    -----------------------------------------

    A more reliable source (I presume), but more expensive: 500g @$16.25 + shipping:

    https://www.carolina.com/specialty-c...00-g/844120.pr

    Also: not sold online, must order by phone
    Last edited by tlfamm; 11-15-2018 at 04:51 PM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    san jose, ca. usa
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    810

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    Ammonium nitrate : 10g =0.353 oz
    Distilled water : 1000ml (1L)=1.057 qts.

    I converted the formula to American for us yanks.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    854

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Manganese parkerizing the name I was after. Been bit of lottery how it works.
    I don't have abrasive blasting at hand so that could be one reason to fail..

    Do you use homebrew manganese parkerizing solution or ready one from Brownels or similar?
    I use the solution from Allegheny Arsenal. It's a concentrate that you mix with distilled water. They also sell a degreaser and oil in a kit, but I just use Purple Power to degrease, and light machine oil to finish the parts. Most light oils work, even WD40 is fine for this, just avoid detergent motor oils since the detergents can be the opposite of "rust preventing".

    That stuff is very easy to use, shouldn't be any lottery to it at all. However, you have to abrasive (not just bead) blast the parts. The process is no good without that; don't even bother.

    Other than not prepping the surface with abrasive blasting, the only two ways I've found to mess up the process is failing to degrease the parts, and running the solution too hot. The end result is darker when the solution is at lower temps, and as the temp increases you end up with a lighter finish, and at some point it all just wipes off.

    A stainless pan is best, but I often use a "teflon" (not really teflon) coated baking pan which works fine too.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    854

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    Quote Originally Posted by gambler View Post
    Ammonium nitrate : 10g =0.353 oz
    Distilled water : 1000ml (1L)=1.057 qts.

    I converted the formula to American for us yanks.
    Much simpler to just recognize that it's a 100:1 ratio instead of some odd numbers that don't matter.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    NE Ohio USA
    Posts
    9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yondering View Post
    Much simpler to just recognize that it's a 100:1 ratio instead of some odd numbers that don't matter.
    That's about 1/2 teaspoon per cup then.

    Oh hello. I'm new to the group and just buttin' in. Great discussion though.

    Best Regards,
    Bob
    Last edited by rjs44032; 11-15-2018 at 05:30 PM.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
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    2,787

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    One pound per cubic feet should be in the working range

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