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Thread: Taig CNC Mill, round two

  1. #21
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    Does the Acorn controller close the loop, or does it also rely on the host/computer to perform the PID/error correction with a latency sensitive interface as well?
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Does the Acorn controller close the loop, or does it also rely on the host/computer to perform the PID/error correction with a latency sensitive interface as well?
    Acorn is advertised as having a built in motion controller, I guess done by a Beagle Bone Black onboard

  3. #23
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    Sounds like Acron is what I'd like to have then. I don't want any host/computer latency or "pauses" causing the mill itself to perform any differently other than maybe slow down information fed to the mill causing it to perform the next operation or move later in time vs. affecting the actual operation directly.
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  4. #24
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    And I assume Acron is ethernet based? Assuming I could command/control it from any system with the software+tools installed vs. having a direct USB connection to a single host?
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    And I assume Acron is ethernet based? Assuming I could command/control it from any system with the software+tools installed vs. having a direct USB connection to a single host?
    It's ethernet

  6. #26
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    as far as I know - linuxcnc is the only one that utilizes realtime extensions within the os. The closest thing would be mach3/4 printer port magic.

    A few things..
    -This allows for the interface hardware to be less expensive. (because it doesn't have to be a motion controller)
    -Gives you access to the realtime subsystem (hal) on the computer. (this is really quite amazing what you can build) and realtime ladder logic.
    -Any feature in linuxcnc is available to all interface devices. (you don't have to buy the right 'motion' device that does what you want. threading anyone? rigid tapping?) you could do all of these (all be it speed limited) with linuxcnc and the printer port.
    -free and open source (and linux isn't scary at all anymore...)

    And I bet you a few pennies that the beagle bone green is running some form of linux...

    sam

  7. #27
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    I love the idea of LinuxCNC, and I know it doesn't have any conversational programming like the Acorn offers, however I know you can write your own scripts to do exactly what the conversational programming does. Not counting the 3d printer, this is my first foray into CNC, but won't be my last.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Does the Acorn controller close the loop, or does it also rely on the host/computer to perform the PID/error correction with a latency sensitive interface as well?
    The Acorn does not receive any signals directly from the encoders if using a closed loop system. Acorn sends out the step/direction signals to the drives. Any closing of the loop will be strictly between the drives and the motors. Also Acorn is 4 axis only. It is not expandable to more axis. It does output 0 to 10volt for VFD control of a spindle motor. Soon there will be an add on i/0 board to boost the in's and out's. It has 8 onboard i/o's now. The software CNC12 is linked to the Acorn board.

    If one needs more axis or more expandability and true closed loop then the Oak board from Centroid is the way to go. It is not expensive for what it offers.
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  9. #29
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    I don't use conversational... Can't really comment. (I either write gcode by hand or cad/cam it) Linuxcnc does have some helpers though.

    http://linuxcnc.org/docs/html/gui/ngcgui.html
    https://forum.linuxcnc.org/41-guis/26550-lathe-macros

    nativecam looks pretty darn cool too..

    https://forum.linuxcnc.org/nativecam...-renamed#81264





    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    I love the idea of LinuxCNC, and I know it doesn't have any conversational programming like the Acorn offers, however I know you can write your own scripts to do exactly what the conversational programming does. Not counting the 3d printer, this is my first foray into CNC, but won't be my last.

  10. #30
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    It sounds like Acorn is definitely sufficient for me and I really like the conversational system ProtoTRAK SMX uses.
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