Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: A More Ambitious, Awsomer 2 x 72" Belt Grinder

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,523

    Default

    I keep trying to think of some way to just use normal square tubing and deal with the radiused internal corners. I've wondered if it wouldn't have been just as effective to round off the corners of the square solid bar he uses for the attachments. Of course without access to a mill rounding those corners would've posed a problem for him.

    But I too may just buy his plans, mostly out of curiosity and a matter of thanks for the entertainment I've gotten from his videos.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ivins, Ut
    Posts
    1,280

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lugnut View Post
    Have any of you guys bought the plans for this belt sander? I'm temped, if nothing else but to help reward him for the great job he done. . .
    Yeah, I bought them during lunch, then went off to work & just got home so I'm going to look at them now! And I bought them in part for the reason you mentioned above.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    High, Wide and Handsome, Montana
    Posts
    1,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post
    Well, you're right, in the final analysis they all simply involve moving an abrasive belt quickly against the work piece, thereby removing material. But a similar comparison could be made between a Rolls Royce and a Yugo ...both will go from one place to another.

    Did you view any of the other videos showing additional features, and the tilting function? (I've watched all of them, so I don't recall just how much is covered in that initial build video.)

    The beauty of the design is in the adaptability. It permits interchanging several other attachments (tables, wheels, jigs, etc.) all maintaining the same relative positioning.

    One thing that amazed me was the precision that he maintained in welding all those little pieces into functional sub-assemblies that fit together right. ...maybe that's a trivial matter for some, but it impresses the hell outta me.
    Another *good* belt sander. Your analogy is exaggerated.. in both directions
    The tilt doesn't do anything for me really..I like the belt to run the work down into the table. I don't see what could be done on it that couldn't in vert position. A really long straight edge? the more material in contact the more it's going to want to zip away.

    It's nice and all... just seems a bit over cooked.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ivins, Ut
    Posts
    1,280

    Default

    Looked at the plans this evening. Very well done with lots of pictures. I think the build would go easier and quicker in a typically equipped machine shop, but the plans allow pretty much anyone with basic tools and a welder to give it a go.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    4,255

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by softtail View Post
    The tilt doesn't do anything for me really..I like the belt to run the work down into the table. I don't see what could be done on it that couldn't in vert position. A really long straight edge?
    -The main reason for horizontal is to work flat edges. Yes, you can do it vertically, but having the work rest flat and square to the belt makes it a LOT easier. My belt grinder will tilt horizontally, but I have to readjust the work table when I do it- it's easy, but still another step, unlike this guy's design.

    The knifemakers like the flat platen for doing blade profiling as well, the wider contact helps make smoother long-radii curves.

    It's all preference. Some people like it, some don't. I know a guy that even an "easy and quick to convert" design would take too long- he simply bought five grinders and had a different wheel, grit or work stop set up on each one.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    359

    Default

    What makes this 2 X 72 grinder unique is the robustness of the build. I would venture to say it's probably the heaviest of the bench top DIY grinders out there which helps it operate almost vibration free. I plan to build Jeremy's grinder partly to support him but mostly because I like the design and robustness.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,428

    Default

    I have a spare 220v 2hp motor laying around, think it would make for a nice belt sander.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    438

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lugnut View Post
    Have any of you guys bought the plans for this belt sander? I'm temped, if nothing else but to help reward him for the great job he done. I have been thinking about building a 2X72 sander and utilizing treadmill motor. I see no reason a treadmill motor wouldn't work on this one with a little modification. This kid put a lot of thought and effort into his sander/grinder.
    Eh, having fried 3 or 4 of them id recommend staying away from treadmill motors, with some exceptions. Most of them are open frame permanent magnet motors, bad for a grinder cause they attract steel dust like nothing else, and once it gets in there it fries the motor. You could find a way to seal the motor off from ingress, but honestly its more effort than its probably worth for whatll still be a time bomb. Im also not fond of the controllers, having fried several of those too... Im probably more to blame for the controllers though.

    That said, if you can find a treadmil with a TEFC motor, thatd work fairly well, though it leads to another problem; most treadmill motors are flat out underpowered for a belt grinder. All the onces ive seen claim to be in the 2hp zone, but theyre using the same calibration machine as shop-vac makers. In reality, id wager the HP would be closer to 3/4-1, too small in my opinion. Ive got a 2hp TEFC induction motor on my 2x72 grinder, and honestly thats the minimum id recommend. Ive actually got plans to drop in a 3hp 3-phase motor i have just to get that extra power, as well as the speed control.

    As far as the linked plans go, i havent bought them but to me the machine looks incredibly solid and well thought out, but (and this is a big but), it looks far to overengineered for what it is. Things like the ability to tilt the entire machine sound nice, but in reality its a lot of extra complexity for a feature that very likely wont be used much. I use my 2x72 grinder all the time, ive got a few hundred hours of use on my most recent one and a few times that on my last one, and never once have i wished i had the ability to turn it on its side. Im also not too big on the idea of having the drive wheel directly mounted to the motor, i very much prefer having the motor separate from everything and having the machine be belt-driven. Repairs are easier, as is replacement, not locked into a certain motor frame or style, etc... The other thing that grabs my eye is the tensioner, it uses a torsion spring. Seems somewhat difficult to source, and im not too big on springs for tensioning anyways, i prefer gas springs. Coil springs change tension too much in my opinion, with a gas spring i know that my belts have the 30lbs of tension recommended by the manufacturer.

    Again, i dont want it to sound like im trashing this guys plans, im not at all. He did a fantastic job on them, and im very impressed with the results. That said though, i do believe that the machine is overengineered for what it is, and you can do the same thing for a lot less, both in terms of materials cost and effort. If youd like, ive got the CAD files for the grinder i made lying around somewhere, more than happy to pass them around. Nowhere near as fancy, doesnt even tilt or anything, but it runs smooth, is compatible with KMG accessories, and can be build with nothing more complicated than a hacksaw, drill press and welder (i know because thats all i used to build mine).

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,463

    Default

    But but...... he finally fires it up and the belt wobbles! It is obvious in the video. He ignores it. All that work and heft, and the belt is wonky. What gives?

    It looks much like that "help" thread that was posted a few weeks ago. Whatever happened in that case? Did the OP go MIA, never to report back?

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    4,501

    Default

    Oh heck yeah. I like it. I like tools that are versatile. I have been using the 6x48 delta for metalwork but have always wanted a 2x72 also. Makes more sense to make one.

    Gonna go buy some plans. Thanks for the post. JR

    P.S. If you use your american express you will get a $10 credit from esty. Only good for today.
    Last edited by JRouche; 12-05-2018 at 04:26 PM.
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •