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Thread: Engine Flywheel Resurfacing

  1. #21
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    May 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by OaklandGB View Post
    3 Phase, I completely agree. I was just pointing out the disappointment that sets in when you realize it all has to come apart....again..... Agree, best to use known good parts in the first place. A few bucks isn't worth the added pain of a redo under the vehicle.

    I did think the mill grind might have some merit but not sure what pro machinists use for this purpose.

    Good discussion all around.
    The whole point to reusing what you have is the fact that it's labor intensive and you don't want to have to do it twice,

    if the flywheel teeth look good and it's easy grind/cleanup then run it, it's already got a track record and if the engine was smooth you know a good balance, going brand new china is no guarantee for anything and you might just find vibrates or has weak starter engagement teeth - not worth taking out an engine main bearing by running some POS you should have never bought and put on in the first place... flywheels are dead simple... can be re-used many a time...

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    The whole point to reusing what you have is the fact that it's labor intensive and you don't want to have to do it twice,

    if the flywheel teeth look good and it's easy grind/cleanup then run it, it's already got a track record and if the engine was smooth you know a good balance, going brand new china is no guarantee for anything and you might just find vibrates or has weak starter engagement teeth - not worth taking out an engine main bearing by running some POS you should have never bought and put on in the first place... flywheels are dead simple... can be re-used many a time...
    I fully agree. That's why I try and buy the best/top of the line parts whenever I'm replacing something which is a real PITA to replace, like a clutch/pressure plate/etc. And that includes having the existing part(s) rebuilt if they are indeed still good parts. I have no desire to work on cars anymore, but I used to do everything when I was a kid. I either bought new parts, or brought them to a re-builder. In fact, I was quite surprised after pulling the heads off the 302 in my '87 Mustang (I bought it used with 100K+ miles) and bringing them down to a re-builder, they said -- these heads have already been rebuilt. I ended up going all in and pulling the 302 out and getting a built Cleveland 351 with the help of some friends.
    Work hard play hard

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    I enjoy my hobbies because they are just that, my hobbies. Someone else's idea of how I should enjoy my hobby really has no value to me. You should not be affected or concerned by that either.
    I normally am not concerned , except when someone comes on repeatedly and says, don't bother to fix just buy new..

  4. #24
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    Dec 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by 754 View Post
    I normally am not concerned , except when someone comes on repeatedly and says, don't bother to fix just buy new..
    You missed the point. New can be store bought, re-manufactured, rebuilt, etc. Just make sure what you're replacing/putting back in isn't going to need to be pulled right back out.
    Work hard play hard

  5. #25
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    Jan 2006
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    My flywheel was a bout half an inch bigger than my lathe would accept, so it was off to a shop for grinding and balancing. But first, I did my own lightening on the mill:

    http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-23/TR6-23.html

    Ed

    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

  6. #26
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    May 2006
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    It's one thing I do stay away from and leave to the experts is lightening - for one I would never even consider doing it for someone else and im not even into it for myself due to not wanting to lose my legs,

    your pic looks scary to me esp. thinning out and then stopping half way into the bolt holes, probably just fine but I will admit to say "not sure" and that's enough for me,,,

    plus I like a heavy flywheel - even with just meager ponies you can still get a good launch and also make your power shifts between gears account for something,

  7. #27
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    Oct 2014
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    I think if I had to do it I would chuck up a piece of scrap and turn a duplicate of the end of the crankshaft and and without removing it from the lathe, bolt the flywheel to it so it would be running perfectly true. Then use carbide and maybe a toolpost grinder for the finish. Possibly a dog or pin in the stub to bear on a chuck jaw to keep it from slipping in the chuck although light cuts probably wouldn't have this problem.

  8. #28
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    I apologise for taking this even farther from the OP's initial question, but. wdtom44 posted about making a dummy flange and mounting to that got me thinking.....Back in the 70's I worked in an auto machine shop. We had Winona flywheel grinder. I ground some flywheels, most were for heavy trucks. Big expensive deep cup flywheels. double discs with a center plate. The flange was tapped for the pressure plate bolts. In order to maintain the proper distance we faced the working surface, and then the flange top to restore the dimension. The ones off of green grenades (aka Detroit Diesels) we first turned the flywheel upside down and surfaced the mounting surface. Seems as they rattled on. the crank, and almost always showed fretting. The flywheel was mounted on a circular parallel and a bolt held the flywheel to the table with a conical washer making for a rough centering.

  9. #29
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    If the flywheel is still in decent shape without a bunch of heat checks I have used a DA sander to knock the glaze off. Kind of like a dingleball hone to deglaze a cylinder wall. Right or wrong, not sure. Thought it worth considering.

  10. #30
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    Oct 2005
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    British Columbia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Clarke View Post
    I apologise for taking this even farther from the OP's initial question, but. wdtom44 posted about making a dummy flange and mounting to that got me thinking.....Back in the 70's I worked in an auto machine shop. We had Winona flywheel grinder. I ground some flywheels, most were for heavy trucks. Big expensive deep cup flywheels. double discs with a center plate. The flange was tapped for the pressure plate bolts. In order to maintain the proper distance we faced the working surface, and then the flange top to restore the dimension. The ones off of green grenades (aka Detroit Diesels) we first turned the flywheel upside down and surfaced the mounting surface. Seems as they rattled on. the crank, and almost always showed fretting. The flywheel was mounted on a circular parallel and a bolt held the flywheel to the table with a conical washer making for a rough centering.
    Thanks Tim for refreshing my memory about the deep cupped truck flywheels and the need to maintain proper clearances in order to maximize clutch adjustability.
    I'm not sure when they came out or if it was before or after the hinged clutch brakes that allowed one to replace a clutch brake without removing the transmission.
    But the availability of clutch brakes with various friction surface thickness that allowed one to maximize clutch adjustment range to factory specs was a real money and time saver as they allowed the flywheel's friction surface to be moved further from the transmission from grinding and yet not alter the ability of clutch to be adjusted within an as new range.

    It should also be noted that although as previously mentioned even though a lot of the newer class 7 and 8 trucks are equipped with "automatic" transmissions, the vast majority of these transmissions are not true torque converter automatics.
    Instead they are in fact an automated manual complete with single or twin disc conventional clutches and flywheels. Clutch actuation and gear selection is automated only, no torque converters, so flywheels will continue to need resurfacing.
    However as also mentioned, the demise of manual transmissions in cars and light duty trucks has greatly reduced to number of shops that routinely resurface flywheels. Used to be everybody had a flywheel grinder now you have to look a little harder to find a shop that does automotive flywheels. Most of the smaller shops who's equipment is old and in need of replacement simply can't justify a new machine anymore and will farm that work out to the shops that still regularly service manual transmissions.
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