Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 48

Thread: Engine Flywheel Resurfacing

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    OREGON
    Posts
    635

    Default

    Hey, Willy! Your mention of clutch brakes triggers memories, and not good! Of course torching out the one piece ones was the worst! Our fleet of garbage wagons used "real" automatics. We were running Allisons in the '70s. They gave us grief, in spite of our efforts to maintain them better than anybody. Life got better when we hired a guy with many years experience on Allisons. We got a couple of the automated road rangers, and they did work well.

    I always have preffered changing my own gears. I've driven V-8 4 or 5 speed, 4x4 pickups most of my life, and now that's tough to do. Still can get a V-8 in a F150, and the other brands, but no gearboxes. SIGH. Thanks for the memories!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,288

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Clarke View Post
    Hey, Willy! Your mention of clutch brakes triggers memories, and not good! Of course torching out the one piece ones was the worst! ........
    ..........
    Especially when Jethro takes out the new clutch brake on the first day because he just can't grasp the concept of why it went out in the first place! LOL
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,598

    Default

    I've done dozens. It's no big deal. Just use a ceramet bit an hard spots don't show up. I have a harbor freight 44142 three in one , it has a 22.5 inch swing. Enough for a Ford big block flywheel.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    4,505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OaklandGB View Post
    Someone asked if I could consider resurfacing a Jeep flywheel on my 10x22 import lathe. Ha, ha, ha,... I explained that it is well beyond both my skills and machine.

    I suggested a properly equipped automotive machine shop or buy new parts.


    I would not discount any 10x20 inch lathe. I have one and it does more than I ever could. I have CBN and PCD bits and holders for my lathe. I wouldn't try an automobile flywheel.

    I might do a brake drum or disc

    A car flywheel is cranking. Jeep? Not so much Still. Like you already said. Just get a new one right? Not hens teeth.

    He was prolly more interested in if you can. And that would be yes. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kent, U.K.
    Posts
    2,455

    Default

    I've done a few but only car-sized as that's all that will fit in the swing of my lathe. So long as you don't let them start ringing it's a fairly straightforward job.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,426

    Default

    Nothing like OEM parts.
    Andy

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Yep, my PM 10x22 works just fine for almost anything that will fit into it. I'd never discount its capabilities as long as within its operational envelope.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    gettysburg pa.
    Posts
    880

    Default

    there is a trick to grinding or turning. I turn flywheels in my big south bend. I made a spud that the wheel bolts to just like it would to the crank. then hold the spud. same should be done in a grinder don't just put it on the table and turn on the magnet that will just pull them down then when you release it it goes back to the warp it had in the first place..

    never had a wheel I could not cut in the lathe. just a good carbide cutter and a slow speed. also the first cut has to be deep enough to get under the hard spots.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13,962

    Default

    The multi-stage flywheels are of extra concern - but you can usually find the last machined marks where the disc was - either way in or way out on the radius, touch down there and whatever you take off from that point to where the flywheel cleans up where the disc was actually touching and wearing that's the same amount of material you need to remove where the pressure plate bolts too - at the different level...

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,598

    Default

    A k boomer that is also an issue over looked by many

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •