Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 48 of 48

Thread: Engine Flywheel Resurfacing

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Kent, U.K.
    Posts
    2,453

    Default

    Yep I had to do that on my bike's plate to keep the clamping pressure.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Especially when Jethro takes out the new clutch brake on the first day because he just can't grasp the concept of why it went out in the first place! LOL
    On the topic of clutches my 1990 Autocar Tandem/Tandem grain truck has a air assist clutch.It has a typical Hyd master on the pedal and slave with a air pot on clutch housing,first I've seen of this style,are they common?

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    367

    Default

    I did this one on a mill so they can be done that way. Also converted the center for a bearing instead of a pilot bushing.



    This was the before.


  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
    On the topic of clutches my 1990 Autocar Tandem/Tandem grain truck has a air assist clutch.It has a typical Hyd master on the pedal and slave with a air pot on clutch housing,first I've seen of this style,are they common?
    I've heard of them before but have never driven anything with one installed, although I do know that some Macks and Volvos had them in addition to Autocar. All of the Western Stars, Macks, Navistars and Kenworths that I'm more familiar with all had strictly mechanical linkages for the clutch.

    How are they to operate? I'm guessing a little more "clutch leg" friendly.

    Been meaning to ask, did you get enough dry weather in Oct. to be able to justify getting the grain truck out of the barn? Pretty wet/cold Sept. up your way if I recall.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    I've heard of them before but have never driven anything with one installed, although I do know that some Macks and Volvos had them in addition to Autocar. All of the Western Stars, Macks, Navistars and Kenworths that I'm more familiar with all had strictly mechanical linkages for the clutch.

    How are they to operate? I'm guessing a little more "clutch leg" friendly.

    Been meaning to ask, did you get enough dry weather in Oct. to be able to justify getting the grain truck out of the barn? Pretty wet/cold Sept. up your way if I recall.
    It very easy on the leg but if not aired up takes a lot of grunt to pedal down,the master is seeping so got new one to install.The bottom slave & airpot setup is $1200.
    This past Harvest was very Brutal, Dryed a lot of the crop but got a real nice stretch of weather in Oct.All the grain in bins but no fertilizer on,that will have to wait spring.That is the 3rd very tough harvest in a row,taking all the fun out it(I have different words to describe it but would get kicked off Forum lol!)

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,418

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
    I did this one on a mill so they can be done that way. Also converted the center for a bearing instead of a pilot bushing.

    How did you turn that? Is it a cnc machine?


    I haven't done a clutch yet but I did surface a plate that I used for a scroll bender deal. Surface finish was plenty good enough for clutch use.

    Andy

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Agree with the low cost of new parts. Wife bought a new jeep grand cherokee, at 10,000. Miles the brake pedal was pulsing bad. Dealer wanted$600 to replace rotors, and said to expect to have it done again at another 10M miles. Went to parts store, bought hi-performance rotors an pads, paid $300, and when she traded at 80,000 never had the problem recur.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    367

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vpt View Post
    How did you turn that? Is it a cnc machine?
    Yes. Very simple. Once X and Y zero are found; Z is then set (depth), then just program a circle with whatever radius and away it goes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •