Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 48

Thread: Engine Flywheel Resurfacing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    50

    Question Engine Flywheel Resurfacing

    Someone asked if I could consider resurfacing a Jeep flywheel on my 10x22 import lathe. Ha, ha, ha,... I explained that it is well beyond both my skills and machine.

    I suggested a properly equipped automotive machine shop or buy new parts. I then thought to myself, what would it take to complete a flywheel resurface job? Mill, lathe, other machine? How big a machine? How to mount the part? I've watched heads, and blocks being fly cut on specialty milling machines but not a flywheel resurface.

    I sort of assumed a large swing lathe and to mount it to a flange , indicate it on the machined mounting hub, and go at it with a cutter until perfectly flat? Anyone have experience on this kind of machining? I'm just a curious newbie.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13,962

    Default

    Technically flywheels should be ground,,, they can contain work hardened areas and grinding will not only leave everything level but provides a nice finish - I have however machined them on my Mill using a rotary table and a flycutter with carbide insert, leaves a nice pattern but a little course - first few take offs in the car and you can hear the course lines of the cut some - then they get mowed down real quick...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    474

    Default

    Not too hard on a lathe with a large swing or has a gap bed. A few youtube videos out there.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    178

    Default

    Hot spots on a flywheel are always a concern when machining. I have had a local machine shop Blanchard grind a few and they did great work and very reasonable. So even if I had the swing I would send them out for grinding as a first choice. Mike

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    6,984

    Default

    I'd buy a nice new flywheel and clutch pack+throw-out bearing/etc/etc. The last think you want to do is pull everything out again. In fact, any of those 90% labor, 10% part cost fixes are usually not worth trying to save on %10 part when you're risking the having to re-do the 90% labor again. I remember the first and last clutch I replaced myself very well on a 1987 Mustang GT 5.0. Did it in the back yard with jack stands. What a PITA that was. IIRC, I had to tilt the damn engine just to get the starter out, or cut into the wheel well, or something really stupid.
    Work hard play hard

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,229

    Default

    Here's a guy doing it at home with a mill and a rotary table of some kind:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTqjQnJW9rE

    Here's a guy doing in on a brake lathe with a carbide insert cutter:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f7Vg2LOXJ0

    Hey, this guy does it on a drill press just shuffling it around by hand. I wouldn't swear to the end result, but it shows what's possible:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f7Vg2LOXJ0

    This guy does it on a Grizzly 0776 lathe with the block removed from the gap. He reports good success with this method for decades:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdrPkLNa57g

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    1,628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    I'd buy a nice new flywheel and clutch pack+throw-out bearing/etc/etc. The last think you want to do is pull everything out again. In fact, any of those 90% labor, 10% part cost fixes are usually not worth trying to save on %10 part when you're risking the having to re-do the 90% labor again. I remember the first and last clutch I replaced myself very well on a 1987 Mustang GT 5.0. Did it in the back yard with jack stands. What a PITA that was. IIRC, I had to tilt the damn engine just to get the starter out, or cut into the wheel well, or something really stupid.
    Well that seems odd..l there are several mfg,s of flywheel grinders, so it seems to be a thing commonly done .
    Almost every auto engine rebuilders uses them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    13,962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 754 View Post
    Well that seems odd..l there are several mfg,s of flywheel grinders, so it seems to be a thing commonly done .
    Almost every auto engine rebuilders uses them.
    Exactly - not only common practice but better than new for two reasons and i'll tell you why,

    first off - if you already know the history and have ran the unit you already know it has a good balance - not so with a "china replacement"

    secondly - the old flywheel has already gone through many heating and cooling cycles so is stabilized and less likely to warp out on you during use "after" the refinish... so more likely to stay true...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Yep, those YT videos have a couple of nice machines working, the G0776 seemed best suited, with the brake drum machine being a little questionable, especially if that mounting cone didn't bring the mounting flange exactly perpendicular to the lathe's axis. The sound seemed like it was out of alignment, but hard to tell. I could imagine the surface not parallel with the mounting flange, resulting in a thick/thin situation in relation to the crank mounting surface. Not good.

    Then, same as 3 Phase Lightbulb, I have bad memories of the install of clutch plates, transmissions, etc., under poor conditions that I'd hate to have to redo because of a pulsing or vibrating flywheel/clutch combo. Sure seems like an adequate sized lathe, with the work properly indicated and trued up might produce the best results. Not sure how the finish is accomplished. I recall the new wheels I've had, have something of a cross hatch surface on them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    6,984

    Default

    I was talking about only using something known to be good (new or professionally rebuilt) vs. trying to rebuild/machine it yourself to save a few bucks.
    Work hard play hard

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •