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Thread: Storage of Shim Stock

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North Central Arkansas
    Posts
    53

    Default Storage of Shim Stock

    Looking for a better way to store and organize shim stock.

    My collection of shim stock consists of various sizes of flat stock, from .001 to about .050 thick. Some cut from standard feeler stock that comes 1/2 wide and 12 long. Others random pieces with thickness that are smaller than 12 x 12.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    6,904

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    Clumsy Bastard.

    Your shim stock should only be from .00001 up to .0005
    Work hard play hard

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
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    1,599

    Default

    I used to store my thin stuff in a cardboard bin box on a shelf. Thin stuff in the box, bigger thicker stuff upright beside it.
    Go thru it with a Mic and Mark it with a sharpie.
    I got lucky once or twice, found a nice bunch of it at a yard sale or auction.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    4,363

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    My thin sheet collection is in a cookie tray that sits on top of some organizer boxes as separators for the drawer. The cookie sheet acts like a drop in sliding tray so I can get at the other items below. But it uses room that would be otherwise not used.

    I use the same sliding cookie tray in the drawer next to that for my assortment of full size sanding papers and emery cloth sheets. Again it uses a bit of volume that would not be otherwise used. And that frees up space on a shelf that would have been needed for some other use.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    29,640

    Default

    I just keep the shim stock in the original package...

    The brass is in a sturdy cardboard fold-up box, and the plastic shims are just in their bag. No big deal.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dracut, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,849

    Default

    If you wnat to be really organized, you can store it in file folders that you either drop into a file drawer if you have one, or use either those cardboard accordion-type things or a portable file box. One file for each thickness will accommodate short strips or near full sheets.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Staten Island, NY
    Posts
    264

    Default

    You can buy photographic negative storage sheets. The 35mm ones have about 7 horizontal pockets, they are clear and they are punched to go in a 3 ring binder.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    11,781

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    I have two assortments of shim stock, steel and SS plus a few odd pieces. For really thin stuff I generally use aluminum foil; almost every brand is 0.0007" and you can't beat the price.

    Presently I have the two assortments in their original packing which is a clear plastic bag plus a cardboard stiffener in it. Those bags and the odd pieces are in a wide cardboard bin on one of my shelves: strangely enough, it is labeled "SHIM STOCK".

    But I have a file cabinet in my shop and I kind of like the file folder idea. Thanks Alan.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    4,363

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    Paul, pop/beer can side metal is a pretty consistent .01 in my experience. And it's far more better (yes, that's right ) than the soft aluminium foil for durability. I just wish that I could find a common sort of .005'ish thick material to fill in the gap.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
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    1,599

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    Some beer cans here are 3 thou.. usually leak if you drop them.
    So you can see why the need for an assortment.. sucks to double or triple up, if you dont need to.
    When I worked in a stamping shop, we used lots and lots of shim stock..

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