Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Oil Change - Jet geared head lathe

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Somerset UK
    Posts
    1,726

    Default

    Why not a good synthetic motor oil, say 5W40, it works with gears pretty well, just ask any owner of a Japanese motorcycle. This type of oil is superior for preventing "dry starts" as it clings to all the surfaces better than mineral oil. Also, a magnet secured within the sump will catch most of the ferrous particals in the oil.
    Last edited by old mart; 12-07-2018 at 12:52 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    N.J.
    Posts
    1,254

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparky_NY View Post
    As well as O'Reillys, autozone, advance, napa and many other auto parts stores. Tractor supply often runs it on sale, $20 when on sale.
    Just mentioned Sam's because they had 5 gal cheap hyd. oil at $13+ at one time and $16+ for the premium stuff.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    I've always used an ISO 68 straight hydraulic oil in lathe headstocks and gearboxes without issue as these make excellent spindle oils and are heavily fortified with rust, oxidation, and robust anti-wear additives and are recommended for this type of service by the various refinerys that produce them.
    This is not to be confused with TDH fluids (transmission-differential-hydraulic) that are also commonly used in some tractors, this is a totally different oil.

    However if you want the Mobile DTE Medium Heavy ISO 68 I see it is available at Walmart at a reasonable price. I doubt you'll need more that the one gallon jug unless you are prone to spilling a lot.
    And yes, install a magnetic drain plug while you are in there, cheap insurance.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DATo View Post
    Many thanks for all your responses. I've read them all. In the meantime I've located an iso-VG-68 at Wal-Mart of all places which has a 5 star approval rating by customers. Don't know what the "VG" means ... hopefully "Very Good". Delivery time 3 days.

    Any thoughts on this stuff?
    Sorry but I missed this post earlier.

    ISO 68 simply refers to the viscosity of the oil per International Standardization Organization testing methods. We are much more familiar with SAE motor oil viscosity numbers like 10,20,30 etc. An ISO 68 viscosity oil is roughly equivalent to a high 20, low 30 SAE engine oil viscosity if you want to draw a comparison that means more to you, as it relates to something you may be more familiar with.
    The "VG" only means viscosity grade and does not describe the type of oil. I'll assume for now that it is a straight hydraulic oil, which is perfectly fine for your intended use. If that is what it actually is.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Mountain Brook, AL
    Posts
    1,181

    Default

    This is interesting. About 2006, when barrel of oil ranged from $50-70 I bought a 5 gal bucket of the Mobil DTE68 from a local distributor for ~$40-45. Now when
    oil is running in the same price range at the well head, same bucket is 2x-3x the price, where gasoline in my area is $1.92-2.10/gal and the price fluctuates weekly.
    Over the years other threads have endorsed the use of the relatively inexpensive hydraulic fluid mentioned at Tractor Supply or Sams in headstocks.
    Fancy motor oils (multigrade) have been panned because of the suspension agents in them to keep debris suspended til filtered out by the oil filter,where in a lathe
    you want that stuff to settle out or stick to a magnet. FWIW the Sams hydraulic bucket is ISO68.
    Steve

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Sorry but I missed this post earlier.

    ISO 68 simply refers to the viscosity of the oil per International Standardization Organization testing methods. We are much more familiar with SAE motor oil viscosity numbers like 10,20,30 etc. An ISO 68 viscosity oil is roughly equivalent to a high 20, low 30 SAE engine oil viscosity if you want to draw a comparison that means more to you, as it relates to something you may be more familiar with.
    The "VG" only means viscosity grade and does not describe the type of oil. I'll assume for now that it is a straight hydraulic oil, which is perfectly fine for your intended use. If that is what it actually is.
    Many thanks Willy. That pretty much sums it up. This leaves me with an option of using straight 30W if I understood you correctly and all else fails. "VG" = "viscosity grade" ... of course, what else would it stand for - now I really feel like an idiot. *LOL* Thanks again.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    Remember that it is not so much an issue of the weight of the oil as the type of oil.
    An ISO 68 hydraulic oil would be a better choice than an automotive 30 weight engine oil even though the viscosity would be almost the same.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    9,081

    Default

    You will have no problem using ISO68 hydraulic oil. Look up the DTE spec sheets and you will see very minor differences none of which may be of concern for your use. NAPA sells a house brand of AW68 remarkably cheap. They are "non-detergent" and you will not have a problem with suspended particles needing a filter. For many reasons, stay away from "engine oils".

    BTW... if you do have "particles" change your oil a couple of times.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
    Posts
    804

    Default

    has sat idle for many years
    Just curious. How many years is "many"? And after how many does one start to be concerned?
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    304

    Default

    I have not seen anything about automatic transmission fluid in this discussion. It would seem it is a gear lube and hydraulic oil combination and lasts for a long time in transmissions. Any comments?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •