Page 2 of 29 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 282

Thread: Why even bother anymore with manual machines?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,794

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post

    Think of it like target shooting. I can practice using open sites for hours day after day and eventually get good enough to put most of them in the middle at 100 yards. Or I can get a rail gun and get them all in the middle, and many through the same hole. One is a test of my ability. The other is a test of the gun's abilities.
    .
    You probably mean "open sights," (as opposed to a scope) ... though hopefully you'll be doing it at an open site free of other people and objects aside from the target.

    A good analogy, nevertheless.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brett Hurt View Post
    Like computers and TV's, they make your mind mush. I prefer to use a manual lathe.

    Keep telling yourself that. Many/most cnc machinists progressed from being manual machinists. Adding cnc knowledge and cad/cam to ones skill set is NOT a trivial process, many find their mind already "mush" and not up to it.

    After many years manual machining I progressed to cnc a few years back. I can attest that manual machining is the easy compared to what I had to learn progressing to cnc. Now, I can do both.



    I agree with what Macona posted earlier, I find the manual lathe easier for many easier tasks and have both cnc and manual lathes. The mill is another story, I don't miss having a manual mill at all, the cnc easily replaces it.
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 12-28-2018 at 08:41 AM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    When I seen this thread topic this morning I just knew this would become a hot thread. The forum prohibits discussion on politics and religion, this topic may be even more volatile.

    Going to be fun to watch ! And thanks RB211 for stirring up a hornets nest.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
    Posts
    3,036

    Default

    I'd love to have a CNC mill but quite frankly the learning curve is beyond my grasp; I just can't remember stuff anymore. I'd also have to replace both my lathe and mill at a relatively big $$$ cost. It would be completely impractical to go to CNC so I stick with what works best for me...manual machines. I should also mention I just don't do all that much machining anymore.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane View Post
    I'd love to have a CNC mill but quite frankly the learning curve is beyond my grasp; I just can't remember stuff anymore. I'd also have to replace both my lathe and mill at a relatively big $$$ cost. It would be completely impractical to go to CNC so I stick with what works best for me...manual machines. I should also mention I just don't do all that much machining anymore.
    Can't fault that logic one bit. As home shop machinists we do this for enjoyment, if we are having fun that is all that matters.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    8,142

    Default

    I choose manual because almost everything I will machine is one offs.

    By the time you locate and program what you want to do (and hope you didn't miss a decimal somewhere and crash said part) I can have it in the machine, machined, and be on the next step.

    Saying that I do want to get into CNC milling however. I'd like to have that option for repeat parts and/or personal projects. Thats more than a few years off for me though.
    Andy

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Avella, Pa
    Posts
    53

    Default

    CNC is great but as a home shop machinist I just can not afford CNC sorry

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    770

    Default

    We have not spent more than $2500 on any of our cnc machines. We don't have any manual Mills now. Why wait for that perfect overpriced manual Bridgeport when you can get a used cnc for the same price or cheaper. I can slap something in the cnc and probe a couple features way quicker than I could on a manual mill. Then create toolpathes that are exactly where I need them. (like diagonal across multiple axis or even 'gasp!' arcs and other odd shapes.) And at a feedrate or tool path that is the best for the cutter..

    I agree with macona on lathes... Unless we are making 5+ widgets or some odd shapes - manual is easier..

    Can I compare manual machining to fishing?

    sam

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anderson SC
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skunkworks View Post
    I agree with macona on lathes... Unless we are making 5+ widgets or some odd shapes - manual is easier..
    sam
    I agreed earlier about using the manual lathe more. UNTIL.... its time to do any threading. Any thread imaginable, fast and right up to a shoulder (internal or external) if needed is WAY faster than the manual machine. I am VERY spoiled threading on the cnc lathe. Another area is tapers, intentional or not. If turning longer stock with a center and I find a slight taper, I just do the finish pass as a taper routine and enter the necessary correction, bingo, right on first try.

    That said, I have not yet tried any thread milling on the cnc mill although I plan on learning that soon, the advantages are just too good to ignore.

    Another misconception is that cnc is mostly practical for multiple parts and not one-offs. Almost everything I do is one-offs as a hobbyist. I do find myself now using a radius in corners, arcs and such things because they are so easy and make for a better part.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Indianapolis, Fort Lauderdale, Babbit MN
    Posts
    1,648

    Default

    At 86 my mind may be mush but I don't think it is.
    I chose not to learn CNC CAD and CAM because there are other things I would rather spend my time on.
    I have upgraded my mill with a four acid DRO and hind it very useful. I also partly retired my coal fired forge and now use a propane forge for most things so I am not completely in the dark ages.
    I love to operate my manual machines but not as a full time hobby. Knife building is also fun as is my hobby of flying my experimental airplane, long distance target shooting, deep sea fishing, working on
    My hot rods, amature radio design and operating and so on.
    CNC would simply require too much time and would make me monochrromatic.
    No thanks!
    Bill
    I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •