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Thread: Why even bother anymore with manual machines?

  1. #271
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    For my interests, CNC would allow expressions of design far beyond reasonable manual capability (and most certainly mine) but learning curve and
    size of investment in CNC at this stage of my life are impractical.
    It's almost depressing to watch all that CNC is capable of and in such short machine time...don't know about programming time.
    Len

  2. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by QSIMDO View Post
    For my interests, CNC would allow expressions of design far beyond reasonable manual capability (and most certainly mine) but learning curve and
    size of investment in CNC at this stage of my life are impractical.
    It's almost depressing to watch all that CNC is capable of and in such short machine time...don't know about programming time.
    Play with a 3d printer, it allows for your creativity to be even further explored than what a CNC mill can do because of the unique capabilities of additive manufacturing.
    Don't have to worry about Gcode, only learning a good cad package like Fusion360.

  3. #273
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    By looking at the ability of this guy, I have to wonder the other way around.
    Why bother with cnc if you can do this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bu57yj7ZSqU

  4. #274
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    That is because he is an artist.... I am not an artist...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
    By looking at the ability of this guy, I have to wonder the other way around.
    Why bother with cnc if you can do this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bu57yj7ZSqU

  5. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ringo View Post
    By looking at the ability of this guy,
    George is or was a regular poster here and has a long list of very nice model engine projects like that. He does a lot of manual whittling, you'd needs lots of patience for that...I'd be wanting a cnc for a lot of his work
    .

  6. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    George is or was a regular poster here and has a long list of very nice model engine projects like that. He does a lot of manual whittling, you'd needs lots of patience for that...I'd be wanting a cnc for a lot of his work
    It's even more impressive when you consider that he made his living programming and running CNCs. Fully capable of doing it the easy way, but also able to do the work on a mill drill and make it look like it came out of a CNC.

    George displays at the NAMES show every year and the models are even more amazing when viewed in person.
    George

  7. #277
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    I read some threads on PM on CNC conversion of Deckels and it does not seem as straight forward as just fitting motors to the drives. Even upgrading older NC deckels or CNC deckels running Dialog software to a modern setup was kinda troublesome, apparently the reason is these modern CNC programs are designed around modern machines with rolling surfaces, not sliding ones.

    And the constant stop start and small, quick, jerky movements tends to break the oil films and so wear out the machines much faster, older dialog software avoided these kinds of movements I read for these reasons. I suspect that's an issue that carries over into any old machine being upgraded and that some kind of changes have to be made to the oiling system to compensate, if that is doable.

  8. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisCA View Post
    I read some threads on PM on CNC conversion of Deckels and it does not seem as straight forward as just fitting motors to the drives. Even upgrading older NC deckels or CNC deckels running Dialog software to a modern setup was kinda troublesome, apparently the reason is these modern CNC programs are designed around modern machines with rolling surfaces, not sliding ones.

    And the constant stop start and small, quick, jerky movements tends to break the oil films and so wear out the machines much faster, older dialog software avoided these kinds of movements I read for these reasons. I suspect that's an issue that carries over into any old machine being upgraded and that some kind of changes have to be made to the oiling system to compensate, if that is doable.
    That was a consideration when i converted my old Bridgeport, its one of the reasons I keep the rapids low and would'nt bother trying to do any V-carving on it, it was a big lumbering old lump and still is a big lumbering old lump just with a computer telling her what to do The other big issue with a Bridgeport is poor Z clearance - I got round this by sending all tool length offsets to the knee as another axis, this way i have at least got all of my z axis to play with.

  9. #279
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    ..its always fairly easy with a CNC, obviously George and a few others enjoy the challenge, of doing it manually.. but having it look like it was done on an automatic.
    It's a tremendous amount of satisfaction, as well as work to do things that way.. a lot of folks just want to push a button, than accept the challenge.,

  10. #280
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    If doing any sortof production, and that could b ONE PART if it is complex, but more usually 10+ parts of reasonable simplicity, I'd reach for the CNC..... if I had one.

    I may convert the Benchmaster eventually, that would make sense for my typical size part. I turned down some side work simply because I did not want to hold tolerance on a complex part over 20 pieces... CNC would make them all the same, and that is where it shines.

    Of course, things are increasingly designed in CAD even in the home shop, so from there to the CNC is a relatively short step, if you already know your process well enough to have first part confidence.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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