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Thread: Why even bother anymore with manual machines?

  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    .......

    bottom line is were all one and the same - the only thing we should be bagging on is the "shaper" people - shapers don't belong anywhere but Fred Flintstones shop --- show me a shaper in anyones shop (who you would consider "sane") that does not have a thick layer of dust on it,,, they are either being bought by people who don't know any better - or being sold by people who didn't know any better at the time but now do, all the other ones are doing what they do best - collecting dust...

    I understand we have to fight to improve ourselves - so lets start by ousting the shaper people... and get some harmony back in this group!!! Signed; Colonel Sherman T. Potter.
    I have TWO of them bad boys, and BOTH are collecting dust. I robbed the drive pulley off one to put on the mill..... how's that? Before I got the mill, I used one of them AS my mill.... did a lot of strange things with it, made gears, bevel gears, etc.

    But I'll tell you a secret.... I'm considering getting one of them running again, because there are some things they do BETTER than a mill. Anything you want flat, for starters.... They do "flat" very well. I just wish for more travel.

    What I should do is get a planer with a stroke of maybe 8 feet. I'd be doing the beds of a lot of old worn SB lathes then. A planer and an overhead crane.... yep.

    CNC THAT!

    (it might be interesting to do, actually.....)
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  2. #162
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    Those large planers were used extensively in building steam locomotives. Making frames flat, the connecting rods, etc.
    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    I have TWO of them bad boys, and BOTH are collecting dust. I robbed the drive pulley off one to put on the mill..... how's that? Before I got the mill, I used one of them AS my mill.... did a lot of strange things with it, made gears, bevel gears, etc.

    But I'll tell you a secret.... I'm considering getting one of them running again, because there are some things they do BETTER than a mill. Anything you want flat, for starters.... They do "flat" very well. I just wish for more travel.

    What I should do is get a planer with a stroke of maybe 8 feet. I'd be doing the beds of a lot of old worn SB lathes then. A planer and an overhead crane.... yep.

    CNC THAT!

    (it might be interesting to do, actually.....)

  3. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by 754 View Post
    If the power grid blows up, I can still run my flat belt South Bend off a waterwheel and shaft I think..
    You could set up any motor driven lathe mill etc to a water wheel if you needed to, or use it to run a generator which could be used to run the same equipment and unfortunately the CNC stuff too. Of course there aren't many places were this is really feasible. Better plan ahead and buy the land and necessary equipment now. Since you have gone that far why not just go ahead and set it up now.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  4. #164
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    If the power grid blows up, I'm pretty sure getting metal working machines running would be about the lowest priority. Things like food, water and such would be the big problem.

    Its interesting that so many people out there think that multiple piece runs are the primary reason for cnc. I have a friend that does injection molding dies, they are full of 3d curves and hardly a flat surface to be found, all tight tolerance work. Its not uncommon for him to work on one mold for several months. Of course 95% is done on cnc mills. Its also considered one of the most highly skilled areas of machining, hardly something considered a "button pusher"

    The thread has a lot of valid points but also a lot of misconceptions. In fairness, I think most of the misconceptions are because they have not been exposed to actually operating a cnc for any time. Its the same as non machinist people being amazed that you can actually make a bolt or nut.

  5. #165
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    ^^^^ +10

  6. #166
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    When I was involved in the high production sawmill business in the mid 1980's I spent a lot of time up in the Ottawa valley area, which used to be a regular hub of logging and sawmills. There was one little village way, way out in the middle of nowhere that I went to visit, because I was told it would be interesting. It was very interesting. There were about 9 houses in the village, which had been abandoned. Some of the houses still had furniture in them, one even had dishes on the table. Not a soul lived there. There was an old line-shaft sawmill driven by a water turbine. It was all locked up and I couldn't get in to see more, but there were lots of cracks in the weathered old boards. Inside, in the bottom of the mill there was a great big old lathe, with the belt still on it leading up to an overhead line-shaft.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  7. #167
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    This is what CNC is all about.

    Work hard play hard

  8. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    You could set up any motor driven lathe mill etc to a water wheel if you needed to, or use it to run a generator which could be used to run the same equipment and unfortunately the CNC stuff too. Of course there aren't many places were this is really feasible. Better plan ahead and buy the land and necessary equipment now. Since you have gone that far why not just go ahead and set it up now.
    The point I was making, was the South Bend due to design, is like the old line shaft machines. To set up a line shaft is pretty simple compared to generating power in a form to run a lot of electronics.
    Up were we live Hydro power istream are usually pretty close by.
    What I was illustrating was some types of machinery or control systems are very dependent on stable electrical supply.
    I have seen treadle lathes but they were not cnc..

  9. #169
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    When civilisation crumbles sure lots of people with rig up wind and water generators but the military will collar the remaining microprocessors and most electronics only last about 10 years. Unless your cnc is churning out gun parts you won't get spares.

  10. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baz View Post
    When civilisation crumbles sure lots of people with rig up wind and water generators but the military will collar the remaining microprocessors and most electronics only last about 10 years. Unless your cnc is churning out gun parts you won't get spares.
    This is such a crappy argument. Are you going to make your own carbide inserts? HSS blanks? Run your own steel mill? Our hobby is so incredibly dependent on established infrastructure that all of your consumables will become more precious than platinum, gold, etc... No one is going to be machining parts in such a situation, you’ll be hunting and gathering.

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