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Thread: New Cars And Blinding Head Lights

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    5,896

    Default New Cars And Blinding Head Lights

    I know that the newer cars have been coming through with LED head lights for some time now but lately some of these newer head lights are blinding.
    I'm really getting pissed off at these on coming cars with these blinding white lights that I give them my high beams until we pass by. Some flash me back with even brighter lights and some do nothing. I'm temporarily blinded with these on coming lights, I can't see the road and it takes several seconds for my eyes to adjust.
    The other night I gave an oncoming car my high beams because his lights were blinding, as we passed I saw it was a cop. I was hoping he would turn around and pull me over but he just kept going. I'm sure it's not the first time some on coming car flashed him.
    Any body else find this to be annoying or dangerous??

    Searching around on the net I found this posted, so I guess I'm not the only one that finds this to be a danger to on coming traffic.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...g-drivers.html

    JL.................

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    san jose, ca. usa
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
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    7,369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Any body else find this to be annoying or dangerous??
    Yes, I find it very annoying when someone flashes their high beams at me.
    Work hard play hard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    North Central Texas
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    2,469

    Default

    Look at the line on the right shoulder until they pass. It definitely helps, and it is about all one can do.
    The upper line of light is sharply defined with modern lenses, and of course, they are much brighter. In the old days, the limits were much more diffused. There are a lot of hills on the county roads around here, and as a result, when the opposing traffic is coming at you uphill, the brightness is somewhat blinding. The price we pay for badass headlights...
    Whenever I drive anything with halogen sealed beams, I am reminded of the staggering difference/improvement.
    State inspections here no longer require headlight aiming and I wish they would bring that back.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
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    2,877

    Default

    Remember the old Cibie halogen headlights? I put four of them in my old 1970 Pontiac 2+2 and on high beam I had GREAT illumination and on low beam, even with four on low beam, because they had a great lens/diffuser they were very easy on any oncoming driver's eyes; if you shone them at a wall you would see a very distinct border between where the light shone and just above it where there was very little light. In that respect they were much, much better than the two regular low beams I replaced.

    How many accidents, injuries and deaths will it take before those POS LED lights get either banned or forced to work properly?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    4,790

    Default

    Mount an adjustable mirror on your front grill, and when someone approaches with too-bright headlights, return the favor (and send those photons back to whence they came).

    Quite some time ago, my father told me about a polarized headlight system where IIRC the headlights were horizontally polarized, while the car's windshield (or the driver's glasses) were vertically polarized. But that caused a problem because the reflected light was also polarized and blocked. I thought perhaps the polarization could be at a 45 degree angle, so the reflected light would have the same polarization, but oncoming headlights would be at right angles to the opposing traffic and thus attenuated. I found some articles, but I haven't fully read them:

    http://onlinepubs.trb.org/Onlinepubs.../11/11-001.pdf

    https://www.polarization.com/land/land.html

    https://blog.safetyglassesusa.com/sh...utions-part-2/

    https://www.quora.com/Automotive-Eng...elds-polarized
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 01-05-2019 at 12:16 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    30,045

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    Specular reflection might not affect polarization, but diffuse reflection should result in random polarization at different spots over the surface, and visibility ought then to be good.

    If the bright lights really bother you, it might be time to get checked for cataracts.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,370

    Default

    This has been a very contentious issue with me as well. Not sure if this is just an LED or HID issue or one that stems from piss poor lens design. Probably a bit of both I think, with bad lens and reflector design being the largest contributor in my opinion. I thought that these had to undergo federal scrutiny, perhaps the standards have been watered down in order to give the automakers artistic freedom in regards to aerodynamics and style.

    These factors coupled with the belief that even when somebody is driving in heavy traffic or literally ten feet off your back bumper they still feel compelled to also use their driving lights in order to add to the glare. I always thought driving lights were for use as an auxiliary light source to aid the motorists ability to see on the open road when you were the only one in sight, apparently not.
    When it's raining the glare is increased dramatically and becomes almost debilitating.

    Add to this, at least in my region, the new environmentally friendly road marking paints. The reflectivity is virtually non-existent and it is all but impossible to see the lines 6 weeks after being applied to new black as coal pavement. Toss in 6 more months and a rainy night and you're better off rolling down the window and gauging you location relative to the center line by looking at the fence posts in the field.
    The glasses linked to by gambler in post #2 do help at night and make a big difference in rain and snow. You can actually see the center line under a couple of inches of snow! Well with the old paint at least. LOL

    I do have a very good set of aircraft landing lights on my truck as auxiliary driving lights that I use when I'm out there all alone in order to spot deer at night. The temptation to use them to give that other A-hole a blast of his own medicine, although compelling at times, is a tactic I choose not to use.
    Bad enough I'm blinded, not much point in blinding that brainless dickhead coming at me as well.
    Last edited by Willy; 01-05-2019 at 12:55 AM.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,138

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    It's not the brightness as much as the piss poor adjusting. Lots of cars are aimed up. The most focused part of the beam should never be higher than the height of the light. Our last vehicle was a CPO. The projector lights didn't work for ****. They were aimed way high. If I remember right, it took about 17 half turns to bring them down to being useful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gambler View Post

    Maybe you better read this, you may get edumecated. ----

    http://www.laramyk.com/resources/edu...iving-glasses/

    Another for you to read --

    https://www.outbacktravelaustralia.c...-december-2016

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