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Thread: Non flammable chip shield

  1. #1

    Default Non flammable chip shield

    After burning a hole through my rubberized fiberglass chip shield, I decided that I liked the function, but needed to up my game. Having just made the amp front panel out of circuit board material, I thought "Copper is pretty hard to burn!" 10 minutes later, voila!

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  2. #2
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    Stevens Point, WI
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    Copper is nice and appealing, nice job!
    Andy

  3. #3
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    Aug 2015
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    SE Alberta, Canada
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    Nice job. What is it's purpose? Never seen one before

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain K View Post
    Nice job. What is it's purpose? Never seen one before
    Doesn't seem to be working all that well, eh?
    Len

  5. #5
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    Helsinki, Finland, Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by shampine1 View Post
    I thought "Copper is pretty hard to burn!"
    And if things get too hot the FR-4 has pretty unmistakable stench.

  6. #6
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    May 2015
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    Is it intended to help protect the ways?

  7. #7
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    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain K View Post
    Nice job. What is it's purpose? Never seen one before
    Quote Originally Posted by old mart View Post
    Is it intended to help protect the ways?
    I'm not sure but I think the idea of a chip tray extension for the carriage came from the days of hobby lathes which didn't have wipers. So fine swarf and grit could be carried under the edge and wear away at the bed and carriage.

    And to some extent if extended out like shampine1 has done it can somewhat shield the shower of chips that falls down onto the lead screw.

    It's not just for the bed either. My lathe has bed wipers on the carriage. But I found that the unshielded cross slide got consistently dirtier oil more quickly on the head stock cutting side of the dovetail than on the tail side. Figuring that this was due to fine swarf and scale grit and the like finding its way into the joint I made up a shield for it. And since I was adding a shield it seemed like a good idea to make it larger and act as a chip tray as well It certainly does aid with keeping swarf and grit off the bed and away from being picked up while working in the area close to the nose of my chucks. And since that's where likely 90% or more of the turning occurs it seemed like a pretty good idea.

    My own guards are done in a medium weight vinyl. The cutting oils reek havoc on the vinyl in time but I get a good 3 to 4 years out of it before it gets brittle and cracks. And I've got a goodly amount of the stuff from years ago. So I just make up a couple at a time and swap them out when cracks start appearing. In the picture below you can/should be able to see the two parts that shield the cross slide dovetail and extend forward to cover off the bed. The cutting tool at this point is about two inches from the jaws of the chuck. And of course as I work in towards the chuck the shield moves in over the portion with no bed rails. That's probably the range of movement that I do for 80 to 90% of my turning.

    Some manages to get under. MOstly when I run the carriage back to get the tool post out of the way for filing in the lathe. But if I remember to shut off and wipe the chips and swarf away to the back splash first the bed stays amazingly clean for a long time.


  8. #8

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    I find most of the chip land on that area; my shield collects them and keeps them off the ways.

    Since I love carbide tooling, I got in trouble with hot chips very quickly, despite the fiber being fiberglass. Kind of weird, frankly.

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Victoria BC
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    I've been wondering what I could do with all that PC board I have left over from the days of 'do your own artwork directly on the board and etch it yourself'.
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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