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Thread: Sort of OT - Nail Guns

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    Tai Tokerau - NZ
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    My experience is only with framing Nailers. my main gun is a Hilti gas nailer, which will sink heads of 90mm nail below any new timber. Old dry hard woods can leave them up to about 15mm proud. This is the kind of timber you need a club hammer to start nails by hand.
    Side by side with a dewalt or paslode, the Hilti has more power. They can be adjusted down for softer wood/shorter nails.

    I also keep a pnuematic, and if you had to only have one, that would be my recommendation. No gas, no bateries, no spark plugs. Maintenance is pretty much just oiling it before use, they don't take much of a compresor to run, any temperature, usually a longer magazine. Only PITA is dragging hoses and fitting into tight framing.

    Other option would be a gasless 18v Makita/Dewalt jobby. These do alright but are heavy compared to gas ones, not an issue for hobbyist but if you're nigging all day/week then adds cumulative fatigue.

    These are all limited to D-head strip nails. Mine all take 55-90mm.
    If you need full round head that's a different gun.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    +1 on what Bob said.

    And if there's any chance of moisture/humidity getting to any side of OSB, I be using something else.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    For small jobs or once in a blue moon usage I would not buy a gun. Rent or borrow. Consider a impact type screw gun and screws for your small framing and sheathing job. Roofing is best with a roofing gun and again Rent or borrow if you only do this once in a while. And siding done in Vinyl must be able to slide in the slots, so nailing is easy to leave loose and I do like to use Lathe screws if the sheathing is wood. Mike

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
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    I built my entire shop and a house for my sister.
    My father has over 10 different nail guns.
    They work well, but they scare the living heck out of me.
    I hate to use them. I pucker my butt hole every time I
    pull the trigger. One thing with framing nailers, they will not
    pull the boards and tighten up a joint like using a hammer will.
    They can save time, but the quality of the fastening is not the
    same as hammering.
    I have also seen these jockeys that think they are freaking
    machine guns, and put 3x as many nails in the board as really
    needed. They end up splitting the wood for using so many nails.
    They must be the same guys who are always jacking the throttle
    on their Harley Davidsons at the red lights.

    -Doozer

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by lynnl View Post

    I bought a little Ryobi cordless 18 gauge brad nailer for doing trim work. It's nice, but I'd be leery of pure battery operated nailers for framing. Given my age, and dexterity and physical agility (or lack of), these nailers are almost a neccessity for any out-of-position nailing.
    I recently bought a Hitachi cordless framing gun and love it.18v slide type battery,shoots about 300 3-1/2" nails on a charge.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  6. #16
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    Aug 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by wierdscience View Post
    I recently bought a Hitachi cordless framing gun and love it.18v slide type battery,shoots about 300 3-1/2" nails on a charge.
    3000?
    300 is beggar all.
    That's pretty tame. I think the dewalts are advertised as 9000.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Central Iowa
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    I have used both a framing nail gun and roofing nail gun both air operated is what the pros use and so did I. Never, ever nail vinyl siding tight, use roofing or large head nails and it has to be able to slide both ways. Sun hits and expands, siding moves and does not buckle. Hammered vs nail gun, all I ever used was coated nail gun nails. Darn hard to pull out.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 01-08-2019 at 09:56 AM.
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Fine Line Automation CNC 4x4 Router

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by mihit View Post
    3000?
    300 is beggar all.
    That's pretty tame. I think the dewalts are advertised as 9000.
    *up to 700 nails per-charge* but that's counting the shorter length.I mainly chose the Hitachi because I already had the full Hitachi 18v line.However after using both,the Hitachi has more power and will shoot common full round head nails as opposed to clipped head or offset round(nails are easier to find and cheaper).Also with the 6 ah battery the drive count bumps uo to 750 or so.

    https://homefixated.com/dewalt-dcn69...nailer-review/

    Neither gun is faster than a pneumatic one,but I'm not doing this commercially and it is nice to just pop a battery and some nails in and go to work not needing a compressor or hose.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    1,245

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    I have a cheap imported brad nailer. Works great.
    I have a medium not-imported Bostich framing nailer, works great.
    I have a cheap imported coil gun for roofing shingles, works great.

    I have tried a couple siding nailers and had no luck. As mentioned you can't nail siding tight or it buckles in the sun. I find hand nailing goes pretty fast on that.

    I did shoot myself in the knee with a pneumatic nailer when I was young and stupid 35 years ago. Luckily it went in just next to the patella and into the synovial space. I pulled it with my handy estwing framing hammer and came out lucky and good looking. It took three yanks. It was in there pretty good.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Syracuse NY
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    For vinyl siding use a palm nailer. The depth can be regulated with a hose clamp on the sliding nose of the nailer. The magnet will hold the nail in place and leave your other hand free to hold the siding. It works good for soffit too, those pin nails need one hand, the soffit panel needs one hand and the hammer needs one hand. I don't know anyone with three hands. The palm nailer holds and drives the nail leaving your other hand to hold the soffit in place.

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