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Thread: Your Shop and the Hereafter??

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Rugby, Warwickshire, England
    Posts
    956

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    I'm taking it all with me. Where I'm going I should be able to set up a foundry as well.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Winchendon MA
    Posts
    1,132

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    I mentor a younger lad (21) I'm 76 he has first dibs on any thing in my shop and it's in writing. He's almost as smart as me LOL LOL but hes a quick learner and retains what he learns.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Victoria BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,061

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    I make sure everyone knows the value of a shop is pennies on the dollar unless there's a professional seller, and then it's dollars to pay that person and pennies for you anyway. Not complaining, it's hard work selling stuff. I know that.

    To mitigate that somewhat, my plan is to build my entire shop into a stepvan. Moveable, though not what I'd call mobile. Then, assuming my kid's not interested at that point, let them sell it as a package deal, all or nothing, let it go for whatever and it's done. Easy is best as I expect they'll have other things to deal with.

    I think the big problem will not be the shop tools, but all the really useful STUFF I've managed to accumulate over the years, you know the stuff I've spent a lifetime inventing projects to use, that I'll never get round to doing, but it's really, really good stuff you know. The tools... there's always someone around that will be happy to take them for free. The stuff, that can cost money to get rid of. I'd really hate to kick the bucket with my last thought feeling guilty about how much garbage my family will have to pay to throw out now that I'm gone. And, that's the kicker 'aint it. All that really, really good stuff becomes garbage in, literally, a heartbeat.

    Okay, now I'm officially sad,

    David...

    edit: I think I'm going to make a little sign for my shop:

    Beep, Beep, Beep, Beeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep ... garbage.
    If you can't use it before it's garbage... it's garbage now!
    Last edited by fixerdave; 01-08-2019 at 07:40 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    sierra mountains
    Posts
    1,503

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    Give my tools away before I die? Are you insane?
    What if the coroner was wrong and there was a little life left in me?
    Make sure I am really cold and blue before you touch the shop.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    208

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    We are all organic machines that come to an end. I am a lot older at 88 on February 3 than I ever expected to be. We moved to Florida three years ago and my workshop area was trimmed from over 1,600 sq. ft. to less than half that. I ended up giving away a bunch of stuff and hauling some to the dump, and I still have surplus stuff which seems to have little real value. Looks as I will have to practically give away some of the woodworking surplus. I also have a couple of nice pantographs that have generated zero interest. My advice is for you guys to think about the future and try not to accumulate stuff that you will not use at all or not use often. I do not think that the millennial crowd thinks at all like us older guys.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    10,417

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    I bet Murphy has a hand in it.....like just a soon as you think its time and give away the best collection, you're guaranteed to live another 20 years, but shopless.

    I'm still trying to get everything running perfectly, I guess half the time i'm working for the next guy. I do see the wisdom in some notes or video on what goes with what or folder of digital photos with captions. Its not just about value, its that if we're just renting, we've an obligation not to commit waste and return the item properly, in good shape and complete. Put the right steady with the right lathe so its better for the next guy
    .

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Four Flags City
    Posts
    1,006

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    I believe the largest problem for those left behind is paralysis. I went to look at a home wood shop because the widow wanted to get her car in the garage. She was terrified of making a mistake. Everything I asked about was either "I'm not sure how much" or "The kids think they will use that". After lots of talking and hand wringing I bought some lumber and went on my way.

    My shop? I have friends and a long distance nephew that will dispose of it the best they can.......that's all I can hope for.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,499

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    Yeah my dad thought he'd be first to go after a stroke at 48 and talked about dying for more than 25 years. He is now 90 and has outlived all of his relatives!

    I am not a packrat, there is no pile of junk waiting for me to find something to do with it. Use it or pass it on by giving it away or selling. So everything I own goes to my grandson and I have told many times use it or pass it on by giving it away or selling it and I am good with that.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Almost Dallas
    Posts
    1,584

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    I feel it a duty to my wife and my stepson to make it as painless and hopefully profitable as possible to liquidate my shop contents should I die first.

    To that end I have what I call my "ICIC" list. ICIC means "In Case I Croak". In this list, I have identified major machines and the accessories & tooling that go with them. For instance, my EMCO lathe is given a symbol, a red circle. Anything that should be sold as a package with the lathe has a red circle painted on it. Thus:



    and



    I've done this for this lathe, also for the milling machine (blue triangle), surface grinder (blue square), etc. and for other machines and categories of tooling. This should, hopefully, make it easy for whoever sells the stuff to organize it for max return and minimum trouble.

    I also have a list of all machines showing brand, model, serial #, purchase price and a reasonable estimate of what it should sell for, and I have a file cabinet full of organized and labeled manuals and literature pertaining to the stuff in the shop.

    And my wife and I have agreed on a trustworthy local auctioneer to handle this, if necessary. He know this, has seen the shop and seen the lists.

    Ideally, I should be able to work until I realize that it is time to sell out in an organized manner. But we never know, do we?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Niagara Frontier
    Posts
    52

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    As I have said before… my greatest fear is that my wife will sell off the machinery for what I told her I paid for it…

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