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Thread: Your Shop and the Hereafter??

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    Why I am living in Oklahoma. 15 years ago we bought 7 1/2 acres 5 minutes from a small town and 20 minutes from down town Tulsa with a 30 X 40 shop building for $60,000.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
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    1,236

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    2 acre lots in my town (minimum lot size) go for ~$400K-$500K.
    That seems like real bargain if that is right in town,around here that would be classified as a acreage.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    East Coast, USA
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    7,382

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
    That seems like real bargain if that is right in town,around here that would be classified as a acreage.
    It actually is a bargain as the price for 2 acres in my town hasn't changed much since 2001. It is around ~20 miles from Boston. 2 acres in Boston might cost 10x-50x more.
    Work hard play hard

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
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    1,834

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    I have been shop less a few years, but still have most of my equipment.
    i am trying to get a small space to work on bikes and have a few machines.
    I have my eye on a storage unit with 3 ph, that I turned down before in a stupid moment, I hear the tenant may be building a shop.
    If I get that I be back in small scale business, and have a job I can get back for a bit of income if that happens.
    My son got his first bike and want to build some stuff. I want him to get interested in the machines, as a part time gig and to build better nicer bikes.
    I would rather one of my kids get the machines, than simply have them sold , when I go to the manual toolroom in the sky..

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Jersey City, NJ
    Posts
    1,186

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    2 acre lots in my town (minimum lot size) go for ~$400K-$500K.
    25' x 100' here will set you back a cool million. Glad I bought over 20 years ago. As for my "estate", I think my packrat junk far outweighs my tooling. Plus my tools are all on the small side, and far easier to sell than the big iron that needs a rigger to move. You'd be amazed at how high a "classic" Delta 14" metal cutting bandsaw goes at auction. You don't see them much, I think because someone always nabs them first.

    My 19 year old son knows how to use some of the stuff, went through a knifemaking phase. But his ambition is to be a nomadic climbing and mountain guide living out of a tricked out van. Perhaps I'll live long enough for him to settle down and appreciate having a workshop. I knew he wasn't really a "maker" when he made a PVC pipe powered crossbow in the shop, then spent the rest of the day he finished it shooting. I bet any of us would have taken a dozen shots then headed back into the shop with ideas to improve it.
    Last edited by gellfex; 01-11-2019 at 12:47 AM.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Appalachian Ohio
    Posts
    653

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    YouTuber Keith Fenner runs a yearly thing called "whats in your box" in which aspiring machinists (most young, some older) send in videos about their interests and why they want to learn machining. Some committee decides who gets the box(s). Meanwhile other machinists make up stuff to go into the box - tools, fixtures, etc. They get nice stuff from people like Randy Richards, Pierre, AboM79, etc... I think they gave away something like 5 boxes last year.

    ANYWAY... that got me to thinking about a giveaway of my stuff. As everybody has said ... pennies on the dollar. I would rather see my stuff go to somebody who would actually appreciate it and get use out of it rather than let it get sold as junk... Young guys like Mars_red who have to spend their money on raising a family instead of a set of gage blocks, etc. People who would know what a cylinder square is and not think of it as 12 pounds of scrap metal.

    I haven't figured out how to do this, but I sort of think of some sort of place where aspiring machinists would apply... and when somebody croaks off they would be informed and would be responsbile for cleaning out the shop. That would take one worry off the widow's hands... what to do with all that ****. If possible it would be nice if they'd agree to send the widow a few bucks every now and then for a while, but the idea is to offset the possible return from an auction. This would help us (the prospective dead guys) to sell the idea to the future widows that she's not totally losing out.

    Anybody got any input? Is this is a good idea, a bad idea, does it spark any good ideas?

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
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    30,054

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    You are assuming that by the time we croak, subtractive machining is still a "thing".... it may NOT be.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    181

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
    That seems like real bargain if that is right in town,around here that would be classified as a acreage.
    The lot we bought for our house was 20k/€ per acre, roughly speaking. The municipality wanted to attract people with cheap land prices for their developments, though they had raised them since. But lot sizes were usually around half an acre to one acre.

    We also looked at private land but it cost more. And the municipal development had other incentives such as water and municipal sewage, underground power-lines and fiber-optic lines all the way to the lot.

  9. #59

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    We moved out to rural upstate SC 5 years ago. We bought 7-1/2 acres in 2006, and in 2011, I quite my job and started building the house and shop, spending 3 years working full time. I went back to work, and plan to retire later this year. The shop is 28X48, with a 28X32 loft- plenty of room for my toys and hobbies.

    I always figured I would work until 68, but then life intervened. This past summer, they found 70% blockage in the LAD on my heart, AKA The Widowmaker. Since then, I've been careful what I eat, and go to the gym religiously. I'm still having issues, though, mostly rhythm. As a result, I've decided to move up retirement a couple years, and also have a fresh perspective on all of my 'stuff'. I have tons of old hobbies and projects that aren't likely to ever see the light of day. I'm going to gradually thin out the herd, being brutally honest with myself about what's really important to me. I don't want to burden my spouse and son with a bunch of near-worthless stuff when I kick off. What I WILL keep, though, is tools. I have a mill, lathe, surface grinder horizontal saw, and mig welder that I'll keep as long as I'm able. Same for my wood-working equipment.

    I believe that I'll enjoy my hobbies more when I'm not crowded with a bunch of jumbled stuff, and the guilt of projects sitting gathering rust and dust while I do other things. I do plan to catalog all of my tools with pics and descriptions so that my survivors will have some idea what they are, and what they might be worth. Nothing like a good old-fashioned health scare to prod you into getting your house (and shop) in order.

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