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Thread: [OT] Windows 10, Ubuntu Linux, dual boot, HDD partitions, and virtual machines

  1. #11
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    I've been using Linux for a few days now, and I like it. But there are some things for which I need Windows, particularly MS Access for various databases, my Mentor PADS PCB software, and TurboCAD. However, TurboCAD 15 will not run on Win10, and PADS is difficult to install. I have a 10 year old Toshiba Satellite laptop with Win7, on which I replaced the keyboard, and it works pretty well, so I might just use that for the Windows apps. I might make a full system image on an external backup drive, and reinstall a clean copy of Windows 7 Home Premium.

    I have thought about installing the possibly wonky 1 TB Toshiba drive from my newer laptop, but for now I'll probably just keep it as an external USB drive and use it for a secondary backup, or something. Maybe I'll run SpinRite on it to see if it finds any problems. Maybe some bad sectors were discovered and marked unusable.

  2. #12
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    I got introduced to linux via my cnc machine retrofits using linuxcnc. Years back I put it on a old laptop and gave it a test drive for surfing and email. After that I made the switch and have never looked back. The reliability and freedom from malware alone make it great. I have not had a virus protection software in probably 6-7 years now. I still have a windows machine in my shop for Fusion 360 cad/cam but that is all it is used for and I have it locked down at windows 7 level with no further updates being allowed (via software firewall, Comodo). Its only "allowed" to connect to Autodesk on the web for fusion 360 purposes.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I've been using Linux for a few days now, and I like it. But there are some things for which I need Windows,
    You don't mention VM's here, so I assume you aren't using them. Virtual machines are the solution. You can run any version of windows on top of Linux, or on top of another version of windows. It is awesome. Of course you can run Linux on windows. You can run windows 7 on windows 10.

    You get complete control of resource allocation to each VM. Whether it can see the network, how much hard drive and memory and CPU it gets, whether any changes made during the session are permanent or only temporary.

    You can easily take those VM images to another machine in the future. This also allows you to run older versions of windows on much faster modern hardware.

    You can run multiple VMs simultaneously. Once you create a base VM with the OS of your choice, you trivially clone that. Then you can add patches or whatever specifics are required. You don't even need to waste disk space on each new cloned OS - it will only use space for the differences. These VMs are also much easier to backup. Instead of an entire system, you can just copy an image.

    VMs make it much easier to separate the common OS parts from the important part - your data.

    Got a program from 1997 or 1987 that is really important to you and runs on old flakey hardware? VM it.

    The corporate versions of win7 and XP are great. They install very quickly, with few if any prompts. The hardware specifics and conflicts are hidden, so that is eliminated. Like most people I have a bunch of windows licenses that I no longer use, so I do not hesitate to use those versions.

    For many many years CPUs have been specifically designed to run virtual machines. It is part of the architecture. So these VMs can run very fast, often faster than the original hardware of the era.

    The Amazon cloud and even their own websites? It all runs in VMs. It is proven technology and is completely reliable.

    There are free VM systems that work very well. Virtual box is one, and it is easy to install and use. There are others, and some will have better performance.

  4. #14
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    Yep!

    At work we have some old crappy applications for our laser engravers that will only run on windows xp and reluctantly on Windows 7 32 bit version. As we are flushing the the last remnants of win7 out (win 10 everywhere at the desktop level), the remaining "problem" applications are being VM'd... All our server infrastructure runs as VM's.

  5. #15
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    I was thinking about installing Wine on my Linux machine to run the problematic applications (TurboCAD, MS Access, and PADS), but from what I've found, there will likely be problems. I've also wanted to try Virtual Box, and perhaps that will be my next move. It's a bit of a pain to log off Linux and reboot with Win10 just for MS Access, which is where I have my encrypted passwords as well as personal and business accounting systems. I was able to get PADS installed on Win10 (and Win8), but it took some doing to get their licensing system (USB "Hasp" dongle) working. It was reasonably easy on Win7. And TurboCAD will not run on Win10 (or Win 8.1, but Win 8.0 is OK).

    I have a licensed OEM copy of Win7 Home Premium running on my old Toshiba laptop, but the product key is on a sticker on the bottom and it is mostly illegible. I also have Win7 Pro on a desktop HP that I bought for cheap but I don't know if I can use that product key if it is tied to the hardware. I don't have full retail install disks for anything (except Win Me), so I don't know if I need to purchase a Windows OS to run it under Virtual Box. I've seen many copies of Win7 and XP for sale on eBay, some as cheap as $5 for downloads without media (which are most likely pirated and full of malware), or $30-$80 for copies with physical media and product keys usually provided with a junk MoBo or HDD to supposedly satisfy Microsoft licensing requirements.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Microsoft-W...d/323558046754 (Win7 Pro $40)

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Windows-XP-...t/252527391959 (XPsp2 $30 for refurbishing PCs)

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Microsoft-W...m/233004687358 (Win7 Home $65 full retail)

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    with physical media and product keys usually provided
    The corporate versions do not require keys, so that tedious and time consuming step is a non-issue. Also, the clean checksums of some of those versions are known, and versions are known to be clean.

  7. #17
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    I can download a copy of Windows 7: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...nload/windows7

    And VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads

    Now I am trying to get the Bluetooth on my Ubuntu machine to pair with some headphones I bought. They worked fine on my Win8 machine. Apparently BT is a known problem in Linux.
    https://codeyarns.com/2017/03/02/how...es-with-linux/
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BluetoothHeadset
    https://www.nielsvandermolen.com/blu...phones-ubuntu/

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