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Thread: Get me over the hump

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    Loveland,CO
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    48

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    I've heard this from a lot of guys, but none of them were ever able to accomplish what I did. 50 + years of marriable bliss based on one simple rule: when the momma's happy, everybodys happy.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corbettprime View Post
    I've heard this from a lot of guys, but none of them were ever able to accomplish what I did. 50 + years of marriable bliss based on one simple rule: when the momma's happy, everybodys happy.
    True, but a happy husband keeps on lovin!! My wife hates it when I say that=)

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
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    30,054

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Looking at the manual for the PM 11x27 I see that again it's a variable speed with only two direct drive speed range options. So we're back to reduced speed means reduced watts of cutting power available. And typically at the very low speeds where you'll be wanting to carve metal off larger diameters that need high torque to push through the cuts. So I still put the Grizz G0602 higher up as a preferred "new lathe option" in this size category.

    Don't get me wrong. I love the idea of variable speed. But not at the cost of metal removing power. And the biggest thing I got out of This Old Tony's videos along with a few others I then watched on YT was the lack of power at reduced speed. And that same issue is going to haunt any lathe using a variable speed DC motor for the primary speed control. In fact if we look around You Tube at the mini lathe videos that's one big issue I see show up quite often.

    ......
    This is the exact same issue that results in folks claiming the treadmill motors use "chinese horses" for rating. People trying to use a 4000 rpm motor at 300 rpm, and wondering why it barely will peel off a thread-like chip.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  4. #54
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    Dec 2018
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    9

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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    This is the exact same issue that results in folks claiming the treadmill motors use "chinese horses" for rating. People trying to use a 4000 rpm motor at 300 rpm, and wondering why it barely will peel off a thread-like chip.
    Trying to follow you guys here and please excuse my ignorance. Is the PM 1127 lathe going to be weak at lower RPMs with the 1.5hp motor?

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    4,612

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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    This is the exact same issue that results in folks claiming the treadmill motors use "chinese horses" for rating. People trying to use a 4000 rpm motor at 300 rpm, and wondering why it barely will peel off a thread-like chip.
    I never really thought much about it until I watched Tony's videos a few weeks back on the mini lathe. And that led to looking up a few more videos that showed the same issue.

    I still like that size of machine for those in really tight situations. But I'm no longer a fan of the variable speed drives of the type that come on these machines.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    763

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    Re using a tool cabinet as a lathe stand. I bought a Sears cabinet that is 60" long by 24" deep. Removed the castors and put heavy channel, front to back, under the MDF wooden top where the lathe bed rests. This lathe weighs about 175 lbs.



    Shimmed the cabinet feet with plates to get the top level. The cabinet sure feels sturdy enough even though it is made from fairly thin metal and the height is just right for me (elbow at cross feed handle height).

    Good luck with your future project.

    Geoff

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
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    6,153

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowlyslows View Post
    Trying to follow you guys here and please excuse my ignorance. Is the PM 1127 lathe going to be weak at lower RPMs with the 1.5hp motor?
    I suspect that you will not have a problem.

    First, it starts with 1.5 HP DC motor. They usually are made such that they produce full torque at low speeds. I don't know what the 1127 uses.

    Second, the speeds are rated as 50 to 860 in low range, 110 to 1800 rpm in high range. It's already stepped down 4:1 when in the low range.

    Third, the lower SFM that is being tossed around here is for HSS on very large diameters. Use carbide inserts and you can usually use double or triple the speed.

    Between all of those, you have 3 times the HP of the South Bend and an effective 4:1 back gear.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
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    10,415

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    I never really thought much about it
    so many seemed to love electronic speed control for longest time I thought I was the one not getting it lol. Constant torque is great for say a conveyor, torque requirements don't change, all you want to do is speed up/slow down....all at the same torque. But for a machine tool, to have the same power, torque must go up as speed goes down. I've a 15 HP CNC, but my 5hp horizontal probably has a higher removal rate - the cnc is 15 just so its not completely useless at lower speeds, i.e. by avoiding the cost of a mechanical transmission (which is superior but more expensive to make) you better overate substantially to be useful at low speeds.

    Geoff, that nice looking shop is far too clean. Sign of a troubled mind I'd say
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-10-2019 at 08:08 PM.
    .

  9. #59

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    Look at this in the $3000 price range:
    https://www.theequipmenthub.com/used...-engine-lathe/

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Russellville, AR
    Posts
    1,161

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    The problem with a tool cabinet as a stand is twofold: 1. It is not rigid enough tp stop vibration/resonance 2. There is little toe/knee room to allow you to stand up straight while using the machine. If you have to lean over to operate it, it will be rough on your back.

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