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Thread: Shop inside the house

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
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    3

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    Thanks for the advice guys. I hadn't considered the homeowners insurance issues. Or the lovely gear oil smells. I also have a dog that follows me everywhere. I think the garage is the best choice for me.

    I could build another shed, but getting the required power out there is difficult. Anything more than 100 square feet also requires a building permit here. That complicates everything.

    The monthly cost of renting a space is prohibitive. Near here a single wide industrial park site is around $1000 a month. Not even close to hobby money. It's too bad we don't have a "maker space" near here. I'm kind of picky about my tools though. I don't know that I'd be ok with some random dude messing with my stuff.

    The real answer is getting the old cars out of the garage. I have a lot of sweat-equity in one of them, and they are on the cusp of "collectible". They aren't part of my retirement plan, but if my wife can sell them for good money when I drop dead, I suppose that would have been worth it.

    I'm looking forward to picking up the lathe today. It needs some work but is in good shape for an old machine. The guy that is selling the lathe also has a manual mill for sale, that looks to be of 80's or 90's Chinese origin. I don't know anything about mills though so I'm hesitant to jump on that. One thing at a time.

    Thanks again
    Mike M.

  2. #22

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    what lathe and what mill is that??
    I recently got a aged import mill and it is very nice

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Buffalo NY USA
    Posts
    141

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    I understand the temptation to bring it all inside but if you're married its probably better not to. I have a 6x10 lean-to addition on a cement pad out back of the house that serves as my very small shop space -- organization is key.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    5,904

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    Short answer... no. For all the previous stated reasons.

    JL............

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
    Posts
    7,714

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    Yep, keep it in the garage or build a "machine shed".

    I noticed someone bought a keyboard without a shift key. Sure makes it hard to read--So I don't.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southwestern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,140

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    If you are getting equipment bigger then the little 7" lathes and similar mills etc., like a Logan, then the flooring of the house isn't sturdy enough to keep it stable. hard to get the wind out of the lathe bed if it keeps shifting. Concrete is better.

    Noise will piss the wife off.

    Smells will also annoy her.

    Swarf will get tracked into the rest of the house no matter how hard you try to prevent it.

    There will be damage to the room from oil and dirt and swarf hitting the walls etc. and crushed under you feet.

    If you do soldering and brazing then there is a real fire hazard. Had a friend that tried brazing up a boiler for a small train in his basement. The heat that rose up from the torch set the house on fire. He put it out but there was a significant damage to the floor joists above and probably the flooring with it.

    Do you see where this is going.

    A garage is fine. Is it colder yes (if you live in a cold climate) but you can heat it or just go to work. My backyard shop is cold, electric heat and I can only afford to spend so much on heat for it so 55 Deg F (12 deg C) is as warm as it gets in winter. Warm jacket and insulated boots work well and after a while you don't notice it.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,640

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    Mike, if the garage is an attached garage then you're going to have all the same issues as with a shop in the house anyway. The only good thing is that the door is already weather sealed and the somewhat heavier wall between house and garage is going to be somewhat more sound resistant. But having worked on the cars I'm sure you've run into much of the same issues with tracking or not tracking dirt, oil and stuff from the garage already. Adding the metal working side to it will just make things more intense in terms of adding metal chips to the equation.

    The dog being keen on following you also means that you simply want to work a bit harder at keeping the place clean. Get in the habit of making a mess in one moment and cleaning up the next before the next mess. In particular for the chips and slivers events which are going to get picked up and transported by or possibly hurt your four legged mop of a friend. For some operations it might be better if you shoo the furball outside or back into the regular part of the house until you're done and cleaned up.

    Unlike many of us you're more likely to want to cool your shop. Or is that already set up from working on your cars?

    As I think someone already mentioned what about the idea of a small shed to store some of the "stuff" you have in the garage to make room for the machining area?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    30,087

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    Quote Originally Posted by loose nut View Post
    If you are getting equipment bigger then the little 7" lathes and similar mills etc., like a Logan, then the flooring of the house isn't sturdy enough to keep it stable. hard to get the wind out of the lathe bed if it keeps shifting. Concrete is better.
    ....
    It's a slab house, so he already has concrete under whatever flooring is on it. Shifting would be minimal likely even without removing the flooring, but the other reasons are good enough grounds to avoid it.

    He'd have to strip that flooring to be a good shop floor anyhow... Basically even after doing that, there are just too many issues. The garage is better, and he has the climate for it. Basements rule, but you work with whatcha got.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,526

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    I bring more chips into bed from being lodged in my hair than from my shoes. And no, I don't change shoes - just wipe them on a mat and then on wood to feel any chips. And if you think I'm going to start combing my hair to check for chips, it's not going to happen.

    If you TIG weld with low amps properly, with clean work, don't dip much, wait for the gas flow, then there won't be any sparks, and very little smoke or smell. The sparking, smoking and smell comes from bad or lazy technique and breaking any of those rules. My welding bench is a wood bench with 1/8" inch plate on top. More than a three inch weld, work flat on the bench, gets a little darkening of the wood. But I'm talking welding to assemble small projects, not space frames or roll cages.

    I first ran a lathe, an old belt driven Lorch with a 1HP single phase motor mounted on a wooden bench, on the third floor of an old brownstone apartment. I got away with it for a year or so with no complaints from below. If I had to do that again I'd use 2" thick neoprene for feet.

    As for insurance, you're probably not allowed to keep a motorcycle with fuel in the tank in an attached garage nowadays without permission from the local fire authority. They can always find a clause to void your cover.
    Richard

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
    Posts
    6,174

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    He made his decision 7 posts ago. We can probably stop giving him advice.


    I expect a dozen posts explaining why followups (even repeating previous posts) are a good thing.
    There is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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