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Thread: OT: Tooth Brushes

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    Many people damage their enamel by using too much pressure with a brush that's too stiff..........
    I find that very hard to believe. From https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-hum...her-materials/

    Tooth enamel is mostly hydroxyapatite, which is a mineral form of calcium phosphate. The apatite group of minerals scores a five on the Mohs hardness scale; which makes enamel the hardest biological material. Tooth enamel is harder than steel, but a lot more brittle. So you canít scratch your enamel on metal cutlery but you can chip it by trying to open a beer bottle with your teeth.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane View Post
    I find that very hard to believe.
    You some kinda anti-dentite?

  3. #23
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    Sounds like most of you guys probably have teeth that look like flint corn and smell like death.
    Work hard play hard

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane View Post
    I find that very hard to believe. From https://www.sciencefocus.com/the-hum...her-materials/
    That's interesting. I wonder if she meant the gums and not the enamel. Maybe she said "teeth" and I assumed enamel.

    Whatever it is that is damaged by too much pressure is protected by the Oral-B.

    Dan
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    That's interesting. I wonder if she meant the gums and not the enamel. Maybe she said "teeth" and I assumed enamel.

    Whatever it is that is damaged by too much pressure is protected by the Oral-B.

    Dan
    Yeah, I would bet she meant gums. Everybody seems to have different levels of "hardness' that they prefer for their toothbrush bristles. I like the "hard" ones, other people I know like the "soft" ones.

  6. #26
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    Jul 2001
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    Green Bay, WI
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    [QUOTE=Dedave;1218409]I cannot find a decent soft bristle toothbrush, anybody know of a brand and where to buy?
    QUOTE]

    Try Colgate wave ultra soft
    https://www.amazon.com/Colgate-Comfo...SIN=B00CO9NAMK

    All I use and much sifter than others
    Rich

  7. #27
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    Hard brushing will erode your enamel. That also applies to the bite surface. It is due to a combination of factors; especially after eating acidic and sugary foods, because they temporarily soften enamel. Google it.

    https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/gu...on-restoration

  8. #28
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    May 2011
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    Went to the dentist yesterday for cleaning. I go three times a year for cleaning and insurance pays for two visits. I am well into my 60's and have all my own teeth. Teeth and gums look good and are in good shape. One of the last things you want when you get older is to have to eat with false teeth. I don't mind the expense and time spent for the visits, I consider it worth it, and if I had to pay for all three visits I would do so.

    Tip #1: If your dentist gives you "free stuff" when you leave ask if they could give you some of those flossing brushes. These are pieces of wire with bristles coming out of the side like a bottle brush. It has a plastic handle that the wire is molded to. These things are the best tool possible for cleaning between teeth. WAY better than flossing and can be cleaned and reused over and over. If the dentist doesn't have them I'm sure you can buy them at a drug store.

    Tip#2: If you can't brush after every meal make it a point to brush thoroughly, if only once, every 24 - 36 hours. According to my dentist plaque doesn't begin to form till roughly 48 hours after eating, so if your schedule makes it difficult to brush just make sure to do it within a 48 hour window of your last brushing.

  9. #29
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    Jan 2019
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    Never seen what you're describing as flossing brush, DATo. I'm going to have to look for that at a drugstore. Do you think every drugstore has them?

  10. #30
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    I have heard that you can overbrush the enamel right off your teeth if your using too firm of a brush and going at it three times a day and aggressive.

    as far as floss - You don't need anything but the floss itself or at least I don't - I get great results with wrapping around my fingers multiple times, the big thing with floss is try to hunt down the unwaxed version as it will scrape and clean much better - it might break now and then but that't because it's scraping so well, iv used the waxed and it goes through like butter but does not clean nowhere near as good, although some people may have extremely tight fitting teeth and I suppose it's better than nothing as the un-waxed might break all the time...

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