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Thread: I wanna tap that !!!

  1. #11
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    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by RB211 View Post
    Gun spiral tap in a drill. If the holes are thru hole, makes life much easier. Gun spiral taps I am thinking, draw the chips out as you thread. Get a high quality USA/Japanese tap if HSS.
    These work really well with power tapping too. The spiral makes the taps tolerate the higher torque more easily and with less risk of an "oopsie".

    Having bought and used the cheap taps, which are all from China these days, I STRONGLY recommend buying good taps. China makes good ones too but at a higher price than the junk options. But normally buy a good "name" brand to be sure you get a properly ground and relieved thread tap. They're WAY better. Plus a good name brand will let you get a lot more holes per charge on the pack if you're running a battery power drill.

    The bit about the aluminium duct tape is interesting. I'll have to try that. I suspect it would rip away after a few holes though. Might be great for one or two but 30 or 40?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    North Central Texas
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    Use a tap guide block.

    Put a healthy chamfer on the drilled hole.
    Drill a hole that fits the tap in a block of aluminum.
    Make an adapter for the drill to fit the tap (slip fit would be much faster and adding a magnet would help retention).

    So, you would put the block over the hole and get the tap well-started straight.
    Slip the adapter off the tap and pull the block over the tap.
    Put the adapter back on the tap and finish the depth.
    Back out and go to the next hole.

    For short threads, one can use a shorter block - then the tap can just stay locked in the drill.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Edmonton Alberta
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    I use cordless drill a lot for tapping,if holding tap is a issue Tap Sockets are real handy.I use a small container for tapping lube and with the drill running in low range dip it in and while it still running tap your hole.This keeps the entire tap lubed,I use Sowa taps mostly taper point & spiral flute.For that project I would reccomened high qaulity Taps.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noitoen View Post
    You can use a cordless drill with a guide like a wood router base.
    https://goo.gl/images/v571Ua
    x's 2 for the drill guide.Also I would buy quaility taps made specifically for Aluminum,either that or fluteless taps.

    For driving the taps,these Lisle tap sockets work great-
    https://www.lislecorp.com/specialty-...tap-socket-set
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Northeast, PA
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    I have tapped hundreds if not thousands of holes with a hand drill, I have also broke my share of taps doing it. If through holes and above 1/4” it should be no problems in 1” aluminum plate with a hand drill. Under 1/4” down to 6-32 I would still do with a hand drill you just need to take a little more caution, same with blind holes.

    Get a good quality spiral point tap for through holes. I wouldn’t mess with chi-com ones, 1 or 2 taps will get you through the job. Also mentioned, the drill chuck will not bite into the tap all that well. I currently use a tap in a tap socket and then a square drive to hex adapter in the drill. You would also be surprised how well you can get the drill chuck to grip onto the square end of the tap. Put one jaw of the chuck directly onto one of the flats and then grip down. You have to move the tap around a little but it will run pretty true.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    137

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    I have used a hand tap wrench, the kind with the tightening nut on the end. Remove the cross bar and insert in battery drill. You can make a tapping block to get started straight. Through holes and gun tap to drive chips ahead will make job easier. Should work in AL up to about 3/8 tap. WD 40 for tapping fluid. You don't need 1 inch of thread so you could drill a giude hole on top and use longer fastener. A mag drill on a steel plate clamped to the AL might work. A vacuum hold down could also work.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Edmonton Alberta
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    These are Aluminium Taps prices are cdn.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    SF East Bay.
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    I am notorious when it comes to drilling holes at an angle. Not much better at tapping. Using the mill or drill press makes all the difference in the world.

    If you will be drilling hundreds of holes you might consider the sturdier alignment guide that is similar the one Noitoen gave a few posts back. The Portalign tool works a little different in that it has a spindle with bearings. To use it you would normally need a drill with 3/8x24 UNF chuck. You remove the chuck from the drill and put the Portalign in between the drill and the chuck. Its not easy to remove the chuck from the drill, so you will probably have a dedicated drill for this duty.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Por...-/192776697262

    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

  9. #19
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    Chilliwack, B.C.
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    For that many holes- and probably drilled twice each as well (pilot, then tap drill size) you might be better off making a drill press stand to hold a cordless (or corded) drill. I'm thinking a rectangular piece of flat stock as a base (some of that aluminum you have would be great for this), use two columns near one end with a sliding holder for the drill between them. Make a cutout in the base where the drill or tap would come down (so you can see what you're doing). This you can use on any flat surface when you want to make sure you're drilling straight and perpendicular.

    Use one hand to hold the base in position, and the other to operate the drill, the reverse switch, and provide the up/down motion. If you don't have to worry about keeping the drill vertical you can concentrate more on the actual drilling and tapping.

    A corded drill might be best for this since they often have features in the body that facilitate mounting them in a press of some kind. You'd probably want to avoid trying to use one of those drill press stands as they would be too clumsy to use the way you want to- though one of them might provide parts for holding the drill.

    You have one hand holding the base down, and only one other hand to work the drill. You would want to push/pull the drill up and down directly, without having to use a lever arrangement. With the right drill this mechanism would be simple to make, and it will always be useful. You will thank yourself for taking the time to build this.

    Something else I've found is that often a corded drill will have a smoother trigger for variable speed. Maybe this is just my experience, but it's nice to have smooth control at lower speeds- it's also nice to have a reverse switch that's fast and easy to use.

    Danlb showed the basic idea above. I wouldn't use a round base though because if you're drilling close to an edge, much of the base is hanging off the work piece. The rectangular base allows for almost all of the base to be in contact with the work piece, giving less chance for a rocking motion to screw you up. Also, I would be happier to also support the rear of the drill between the guides so there's less chance of it cocking sideways. The columns might have to be longer.
    Last edited by darryl; 01-27-2019 at 05:29 PM.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
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    Green Bay, WI
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    Here is a trick for you if you ware worried about breaking and 'Removing" a tap
    Before you start, grind a grove around the shank of the tap. The grove should be less than the root diameter of the thread plus some.
    If you get to a point where a tap will break, it will break at the groove and then you have some shank stub to work the tap out.
    Remember taps break at the least material condition ( flute root) where the greatest load (torque) is and that is usually the surface point.
    If the groove has less material, that is where failure occurs. It looks ugly but will save your butt !

    Rich

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