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Thread: O.T. Art people are just plain loony

  1. #21
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    My idea of art.

    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

  2. #22
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    That alien must have been a platers nightmare, so many opportunities to carry over solutions from one bath to the next, I bet they charged a lot. It seems to have been made from motorcycle parts, there are a lot of small con rods bent for the ribs and gears and sprockets.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack View Post
    Strange. But then those people probably think we're strange for spending even just a few hundred dollars on "worthless" hunks of metal. <shrug>
    Their loss, and more metal for the rest of us 'sane' people!
    I have a practical way of looking at things capable of accomplishing useful tasks, *beyond* just 'evoking feelings', which can be done quite well for less than millions! I know - different strokes, as they say.

    Quote Originally Posted by pinstripe View Post
    Of course it is. Do you think the high prices aren't fueled by speculators? You cannot value a piece of art independently of the speculators. You may just love the piece and intend to donate it to a gallery, but if a speculator is willing to pay $x, then you will have to pay a bit more to get it (assuming an auction).
    Of course. I am confident we both well understand how pricing works.
    I do however, get the impression otherwise...that... many claim (feel? pretend?) the value is intrinsic and independent, that is is still 'worth' 50 million even if they were the only one that liked it. Many artists certainly pretend so. Maybe this is how one justifies it, I don't know.

    Things like diamonds are of dubious value, and are only particularly expensive because of artificial manipulation. People tell us they are valuable and desirable, the pice is high, so it must be so. I disagree (incidentally, I refuse to participate, and my female is quite OK with that).
    Just some of many things I fail to fully grasp, but find interesting (and potentially useful) the attempt to try!

  4. #24
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    Art comes in many forms.

    A few years back I took delivery of a classic muscle car for a friend. He had purchased it at auction.

    The driver of the enclosed hauler had just delivered $6 million in Ferrari's. I recall it was 4 cars, going into a family trust.

    One of the nice things about art is the appreciation as an investment, and that you eventually only pay long term capital gain tax.

    The Ferrari's will be much better to look at - again and again - than a stock certificate. And they can even be driven.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    The problem with "ART" is not artists.....
    the problem with art, if there is a problem with art, is the that museum curators spend 50,000 lbs on canned $hit (and as likely as not public funds to boot!). While that's messed up, so is lots in the world, so I suppose you have to just write it off as redistribution of wealth. Now if it was private money no problem, that I don't get it doesn't mean canned $hit.
    .

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinstripe View Post
    Of course it is. Do you think the high prices aren't fueled by speculators? You cannot value a piece of art independently of the speculators.
    Define speculator. Is there anyone spending $50MM on a painting who wouldn't fit that definition? Anyone paying that figuring it'll probably go down in value, buy hey it just looks so darn good on the wall? Then again there's the uber rich crowd, causing the $5MM Bugatti's to sell out in day. Its not comparable to our little lives, maybe $50MM for a painting is a ham sandwich to you and I, perhaps they don't care about future value. i mean they could spend that in moment just buy the feeling of being big man on campus at the auction

    For that matter, if there isn't a coupon, what investment isn't speculative?
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-05-2019 at 06:51 PM.
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  7. #27
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    an art story: my mother painted train depots, farms, and seascapes. she would pick what she called "a board with character" from a barn, offer the farmer a new board in trade, and make a frame from the board. she asked $150 for a painting, which just covered materials.

    except: you could see the light dawning on the guy. freeze up, stare at the picture, when he tipped his head sideways, you knew you had him. grabbing his wifes arm, "hey, hey, check this out..." name your price. he had to have that picture to see who else could see it. thinking about everybody he knew, "Sam will get it right away, Bill won't see it if you point it out..." no way you don't sell the painting when that happens.

  8. #28
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    I'm not one of those artsy-fartsy snobs willing to pay an exorbitant amount of money for a piece whose value and meaning is so nebulous that it defies logic. A piece whose meaning can easily be construed to whatever one is inclined to interpret it as on any given day. Way over my sphere of appreciation. LOL

    Most of the projects and machining related work on these pages, to my eye at least, have more appeal to my sense of "art" than the bizarre things I've seen that command 6 and 7 figure price tags.

    A year or two ago I read an article about an instructor at Texas Tech University who creates his metal artwork from metal he finds in scrap yards. One piece in particular that I was drawn to that he called Ferritc Fossil.
    It appealed to me so much that I have now assembled all of the pieces required to make my own version.
    However not being artistically inclined I do have to give full credit to George Gray of Lubbock, Texas for his inspiration. The Texas Country Reporter actually did a little segment about the man and his art a few years ago.

    I realize of course that art is very much subjective but this little puppy is going to grace the cover over the water well I have in the front yard later this year. I'll likely chain it to the concrete casings that surround the well as I'm sure the local hillbillies here will be inclined to liberate it some moonless night.
    Perhaps a couple of red led lights in the eye sockets to give it some twilight charm.






    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  9. #29
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    Art has zero inherent value aside from the cost of materials, and the materials are often made useless for further purposes by their use in the creation of the art (as with paint, which "dries").

    The entire monetary value of art is in what an art collector will pay for it. End of story.

    There are other non-monetary values to art of all sorts, but those types of value often end up increasing the monetary value, meaning the amount a collector will pay for it.
    1601

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  10. #30
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    The Banksy that the OP started with raises a couple of problems. The fact that is was capable of self destruction was never mentioned to the purchaser or auctioneers. Wilful misrepresentation of an article for sale is a civil offence I believe. The moment the hammer came down the sale is complete - the item is no longer the property of the seller who then instigated its destruction. That's a criminal offence and additionally the new owner is entitled to compensation while still retaining the ownership of the damaged article. If I'd been rich enough to be the new owner I'd have been suing his ass off.

    Meanwhile last year I went to an outdoor sculpture exhibition at Wisley (famous gardens near London). Lots of bent scrap metal typically 500 to 1200 plus some nice bronze life sized models of birds of prey. However they weren't bronze, just epoxy, life expectancy maybe 10 years. I don't think a lot of buyers would understand that they weren't going to last like the real bronze items they were familiar with.

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