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Thread: Wire termination crimping tool?

  1. #41
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    the bproblem with crimping is that, unlike soldering, it does not exclude moisture, and thereforecorrosion is a problem. We used to solder all earthing terminals, and then wash and tape. It is the modern "fast" way to do it, but it is certainly not the best! We are accepting ever lower standards.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    the bproblem with crimping is that, unlike soldering, it does not exclude moisture, and thereforecorrosion is a problem. We used to solder all earthing terminals, and then wash and tape. It is the modern "fast" way to do it, but it is certainly not the best! We are accepting ever lower standards.
    Proper crimp fitting is pretty much gas tight and corrosion is not much of a problem. It's also stronger mechanically and easier to do properly on large size cables vs soldering.
    Plus it's not sensitive to some heating like what you get in a 3000 amp electric go-cart..

  3. #43
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    Crimping os pretty old now, it goes back into the 40s and aerospace applications.

    I'd not in any way characterize it as a "cheap substitute". It is well proven and works when done halfway decently.

    Now, it your name is Bubba, and you squash a split-barrel connector onto a solid wire, using a pair of needle nose pliers, as a previous owner of my house did, then that might be a different matter.
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  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abner View Post
    I like my Klein stripper. About $30.00 USA. Has the stripper up front and the crimper in back. I had two older and cheaper ones that were the reverse and I find having the stripper up front easier to use for what ever reason. Had them for years now and bought my daughter and son in law one for a gift.
    Klein! I forgot Klein in my list. They make very good tools, including crimpers.
    Paul A.

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  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    the bproblem with crimping is that, unlike soldering, it does not exclude moisture, and thereforecorrosion is a problem. We used to solder all earthing terminals, and then wash and tape.
    A marine electrician friend of mine dips the wire end in dielectric grease before inserting into the terminal.
    He has told me that you have to be careful soldering connectors in applications exposed to vibration, as the wire is much more likely to break at the solder interface than if just crimped.

  6. #46
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    This is not correct. Yes, a bad crimp does not exclude moisture and that is a problem. But, as a factory rep from one of the well known companies explained, when properly done with the proper tools and using matching terminals and wire sizes and types, a crimp connection involves deformation of the metal involved and enough pressure to produce SPOT WELDS. Those spot welds ARE GAS TIGHT. If you want a fact that shows this, just look at the connectors that are used on coaxial and other cables that carry high frequency signals. The common BNC connector is an example. And almost every commercially made BNC and other type of connector for these very fussy signals are installed with CRIMPING. These connectors are often made for outdoor use and are exposed to rain, salt spray, and other chemicals in the air. And they DO work. I have personally installed tens of thousands of them and when proper tools are used, they virtually always last for years, even decades if no mechanical damage is done to them.

    This is why it is so important to use the proper combination of wire and terminal AND the proper tool that is used properly. And it is the reason why my fast and dirty test that I mentioned above is a good way to test these tools.

    I do not like any crimping method/tool that does not involve a carefully determined amount of pressure so that the proper amount of metal flow is achieved. This also insures that those spot welds also occur and the connection is gas tight so corrosion does not occur. I specifically do not like any crimping tool (dies) that are used with a hammer strike because that hammer strike is almost impossible to be made with a consistent and proper amount of pressure.

    I am not against using soft solder for electrical and electronic connections. I once designed and installed a ground system that used 0000 gauge wire and 6" wide copper strap. We went to great trouble to insure that all the connections were properly soldered. We even went to the point of drilling a grid of 1/4" holes in the copper straps where they overlapped so the solder could reach all of the interior of that overlap. This was done because we wanted a ground system for low Voltage video and audio equipment where even milliVolts of difference were not good. It is not needed for building electrical grounds or even for systems with higher Voltage levels like 24, 12, and even 5 Volts for controls. For such, higher Voltage systems a good, crimped connection is generally quite sufficient.

    As a 45+ year professional in the TV engineering business, I put all claims of problems with crimped connections in the same basket as the claims that wire wrap connections are not good. Both are only bad when they are not properly done. And both are excellent ways or making connections when properly done.



    Quote Originally Posted by hermetic View Post
    the bproblem with crimping is that, unlike soldering, it does not exclude moisture, and thereforecorrosion is a problem. We used to solder all earthing terminals, and then wash and tape. It is the modern "fast" way to do it, but it is certainly not the best! We are accepting ever lower standards.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  7. #47
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    I agree with paul. All automotive wiring is crimped and lasts for years under harsh conditions.

  8. #48
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    Nothing at all wrong with a properly crimped joint. I have seen many examples over the years in marine and construction applications that have lasted for decades without issue.
    I believe it is thee required method for wire terminations in both civil and military aircraft.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Proper crimp fitting is pretty much gas tight and corrosion is not much of a problem. It's also stronger mechanically and easier to do properly on large size cables vs soldering.
    Plus it's not sensitive to some heating like what you get in a 3000 amp electric go-cart..
    Maybe, but I don't trust them unless the insulation is a contiguous barrier to the terminal. Automotive connections are often sealed way before the crimp so less of an issue.

    I've crimped hundreds, maybe thousands, of terminals for boats, from 16awg to 2/0. For smaller sizes I use terminals with the heat shrink that shrink/glues, and for the larger (like 10-1/0 I buy tinned copper closed-end terminals that I can cover with the same type of heat shrink. Totally water proof. Nothing like salt water wicking up cables to ruin your day, years later. I always use the correct dies/tools...
    Last edited by lakeside53; 02-07-2019 at 08:31 PM.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53 View Post
    Maybe, but I don't trust them unless the insulation is a contiguous barrier to the terminal. Automotive connections are often sealed way before the crimp so less of an issue.

    I've crimped hundreds, maybe thousands, of terminals for boats, from 16awg to 2/0. For smaller sizes I use terminals with the heat shrink that shrink/glues, and for the larger (like 10-1/0 I buy tinned copper closed-end terminals that I can cover with the same type of heat shrink. Totally water proof. Nothing like salt water wicking up cables to ruin your day, years later. I always use the correct dies/tools...
    The above is a major element to a properly crimped terminal.
    As a rule when I've witnessed corrosion near a crimped termination, it is not the crimp itself that is corroded but the exposed wire/cable leading up to the crimp.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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