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Thread: Etna tool

  1. #1
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    Default Etna tool

    Maybe a great oppertunity for someone. Hate to see it go to South America! The only constant is change!
    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/08/n...al-estate.html
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  2. #2
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    It's bizarre seeing that kind of weight set upon wooden floors, perhaps just wood over concrete?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    It's bizarre seeing that kind of weight set upon wooden floors, perhaps just wood over concrete?
    Most likely a wood block floor, over the concrete.

  4. #4
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    Very interesting..
    I wonder what the columns are made off not sure ifvthey are weight bearing or decorative.
    If they are decorative I wonder how they were made.

  5. #5
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    Columns could be cast iron or wood.

    Many old buildings of multiple floors have wood floors supported by heavy beams and cross-joists. The beams are supported by columns which may be wood with a cast iron "shoe" on top for the beams to rest in, or might be cast iron entirely. Those types of floor can support nearly anything you would care to put on them.

    I don't know if the pictures ahow a lower floor, or the top floor with just the roof over it,

    Here is the building, with picture. looks to be 6 or 7 stories, based on windows

    https://www.propertyshark.com/mason/...York-NY-10012/
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #6
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    Or the floors are super heavy timbers if it's more than one floor. Looking at the building on Google street view it's a rather small footprint of a place and clearly a multi story setup. So likely some seriously heavy duty floors done with very thick decking.

    There were a few places like that locally built back when the lumber industry had large machines to produce that size of stock and the old larger trees were being actively logged. The floors were planked with something like 4x6's sitting on close spaced 6x 18's or some such crazy thing.

    I heard about one of these which was a heavy machine shop from a buddy that was an elevator repair guy that used to service the freight elevator used by the building. The elevator was big enough that a good size fork lift with a multi ton load could drive on and off. And the second and third floors were solid enough that the fork lift could very safely drive out and around the floors to drop or pick up such loads. The elevator motor and controls were something like 1920's vintage and still running. Lots of relay replacements over the years but the original motor was still going strong. As of around 25 years ago when my buddy was last in there it was still a machine shop doing big work with big machines.

    Another such place I learned about indirectly was an old lumber mill building. It got gutted and turned into offices rather than torn down.

    It's a tough call for her. We all know what's going to happen in the end. It's just a matter of time. And it sure doesn't look like the sort of place that could be turned into a museum at all.

    A good start at keeping her father's dream alive would be a well done video that showcases the history of Etna T&D with views of the shop both now and pictures that were likely taken when they were working. And some stories from the workers. I'm sure we've all seen some of these on You Tube of old factories that at least preserves the look and feel of what was before it fades away. I'll bet she has a lot more stories in her head than she realizes just from being around her Dad and listening.

  7. #7
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    The biggest expense here would be the tax bill every year.. it would be 100 K or more.
    Which likely means renting a portion.
    Big timbers are still to be had, my sister used 10x10 inch beams in the place she built about 10 years ago.. milled at a mill nearby in Southern Ontario..

    I am not suggesting 10 by 10 is large..
    I can remember seeing big ones hauled by Doman that were 18 x18 or bigger and 20 feet long or longer... here in BC..
    Last edited by 754; 02-08-2019 at 02:35 PM.

  8. #8
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    Wow! Almost $300k/year in property tax. You'd have to make a lot of flowers to pay that.

  9. #9
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    There are warehouses on the riverfront here which have beams that appeared to be 2 x 4 feet, possibly larger. Since they were 15 or 20 feet up, it was a bit difficult to measure them precisely, and it was a long time ago that I last saw them.

    For any locals, I saw them when going to "Lucius Boomer's", the bar down on the riverfront, long long ago. It was in a portion of one of those buildings.

    There is a plant nursery operation in Webster Groves that has the post and beam construction visible in their inside premises, which are in a lower level of an old warehouse. Posts are 12 or 15 inches square, with cast iron caps on which 8 x 12 or so beams rest. Across those go what look to be 3 x 12" joists. The floor looks thick also, no idea how thick.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 02-08-2019 at 03:12 PM.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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