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Thread: Unknown Motor Speed Control I think?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Default Unknown Motor Speed Control I think?

    This Control Box I got at Dump out of Metal Pile,no clue what's it for.The fuses are 30 amps and ID label is missing.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2013
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    That is a DC motor controller for a DC motor that has both armature and field windings. I have worked n them a long time ago but can’t tell you any ratings. Considering how much DC drives have improved I’d say it is mostly junk.

  3. #3
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    Made by: https://www.rockwellautomation.com/en_NA/overview.page
    Don't know what the association with Boston Gear means.
    May be one of these? https://repair.rockwellautomation.co...null/502/0/41/

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    That is a DC motor controller for a DC motor that has both armature and field windings. I have worked n them a long time ago but canít tell you any ratings. Considering how much DC drives have improved Iíd say it is mostly junk.
    That wouldn't run a DC treadmill motor?

  5. #5
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    It's made by Rockwell Automation in conjunction with Boston Gear. It looks like a relatively recent mini-version of the highly successful retro encabulator. You can see where the magneto reluctance is parceled in the Mogley bridge around AR1 in the lower left of the PCB, and the capacitive diractance is monitored by the capacitive parcler of C14, C15 and C17 controlling Q3 in the upper right hand corner. The two are then modially interacted by AR2 in the upper left. The sinusoidal deplenaration is handled by the virtual dinglearm consisting of R1, R2, R43, R44, R45 and D10 through D17 in the lower right.

    You can see an older, industrial version of the retro encabulator here... it is shown driving a motor in the standard Lotus O Deltoid conformation. That might be your biggest problem - finding a motor with the seventh winding connected by a differential girdle sping to a non reversible trundy pipe to the upend of a gram meter.


  6. #6
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    Oh no, not again...

  7. #7
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    Wow Dan, I'm really enlightened! lol.

  8. #8
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    "It's made by Rockwell Automation..." is the only part I believe.

  9. #9

    Default Electron Theory

    The basic problem is the blue butt splices are too small and they are choking the electron flow to the flux capacitor and possibly to the encabulator. I believe some of the wires are too long resulting in "tired electrons" a common problem in older speed control units.

    OAD

  10. #10
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    That uses a SCR bridge similar to the TM MC60 or the low end KB controllers, you should be able to run a TM motor OK, you just don't need the field output.
    Max.

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